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Sunday, October 18, 2020
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18 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on Grenfell secrets: regeneration shame | Editorial
The Guardian
Evidence of ‘offline’ negotiations and altered priorities is exposing the attitude of the authorities to the tower and its residents What began in the stunned aftermath of the Grenfell Tower fire in June 2017 continues at the public inquiry. Establishing, through an examination of the facts, who was responsible for the
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18 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on The Great British Bake Off: a far from guilty pleasure | Editorial
The Guardian
It has always existed in a parallel universe, free from real-world anxieties. Now the show is seductive as never before The Great British Bake Off has always felt part of another, kinder, parallel universe, uniquely protected from the harsh and wicked realities of the real world. Inside the tent the stakes for success and failure, for gladness and despondency, are comically low: whether an Italian meringue will add too much sweetness to a brownie; whether a Genoese sponge will be overbaked, rendering it a touch on the dry side; whether the act of adding polenta to a citrus-flavoured soda bread will cause it to taste like “lemon drizzle cake in a sandstorm”, as Paul Hollywood put it. In the Bake Off tent exists a Britain that is safe, multicultural, meritocratic; where class difference is played for laughs; where oddly dressed men can safely be fond and affectionate to each other without attracting spite. The formula, over the past decade, has perhaps seemed a little stale at times, as it weathered and survived its move from the BBC to Channel 4, and lost its benign tutelary goddess, Dame Mary Berry. But this year’s season is as fresh and delicious as a fruit scone straight out of the oven and slathered thickly with jam and clotted cream. It seems that Bake Off is just what the troubled mind requires in a pandemic. It is a rule that Bake Off never mentions politics – a rule that was gleefully broken at the beginning of the first episode with new presenter Matt Lucas’s cheeky parody of the prime minister’s coronavirus press conferences and the motto “stay alert – protect cake – bake loaves” emblazoned on his podium. Mercifully, though, politics are absent from the tent itself. And because of the pandemic the contestants, the judges and the production team formed their own “bubble” – making the metaphor of Bake Off’s separation from the rest of the world quite fittingly and suddenly real. In Bake Off world, that Shangri-La, people actually hug one other.
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18 Oct 12:32pm Heroic image of medical staff can cause harm | Letters
The Guardian
The psychological impact of working as a doctor is often overlooked, writes
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18 Oct 12:32pm Black History Month needs a wider focus | Letter
The Guardian
British colonial exploitation affected many countries, and the descendants of those who suffered should also have the opportunity to explore and criticise it, writes
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18 Oct 12:30pm Queen sends wrong message on masks | Brief letters
The Guardian
Clothes for gardening | The Queen | Consultants’ fees | Older readers | John Crace This is what I wear to garden in: a T-shirt from the London Greenpeace “What’s Wrong with McDonald’s” campaign, acquired in about 1995; jeans from a charity shop and customised with cyanotype splashes; fleece from a Keswick outdoor shop in about 1993; old shoes – just everyday ones that are too worn out for other wear. I don’t buy a £380 cardigan to garden in (
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18 Oct 9:51am The pitched battle over lockdowns is missing the point: Covid-19 is a class issue | John Harris
The Guardian
The UK coronavirus crisis – even more so in its second phase – is all about basic inequalities – and lockdown makes these worse
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18 Oct 4:30am Boris Johnson is dancing with danger by threatening a crash-out Brexit | Andrew Rawnsley
The Guardian
Rishi Sunak and Michael Gove are among the cabinet ministers increasingly terrified by the consequences of failing to reach a deal with the EU Boris Johnson is telling Britain to prepare
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18 Oct 4:15am How do pandemics end? In different ways, but it’s never quick and never neat | Mark Honigsbaum
The Guardian
Just like the Black Death, influenza and smallpox, Covid-19 will affect almost every aspect of our of lives – even after a vaccine turns upOn 7 September 1854, in the middle of a raging cholera epidemic, the physician John Snow approached the board of guardians of St James’s parish for permission to
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18 Oct 4:00am Europe and America are taking on the tech giants. Britain needs to join the fight | Will Hutton
The Guardian
The government is a bystander to attempts to break up the Facebook, Amazon, Google and Apple monopolies It’s time to address monopoly capitalism and, in particular, monopoly data capitalism, which has been turbo-charged by Covid-19, forcing the world to live and work online. A Joe Biden presidency – increasingly likely – and an EU unhampered by British reluctance to do anything bold to reform or even tax a monopolistic private sector are set to make common cause. They will act in sync to attack the now bewildering monopoly power of the hi-tech giants by tackling its foundation – the simultaneous owning of pivotal digital platforms and the unbridled provision of the services on them. Together, they will go on to reclaim the operation of the internet and enlarge individual control of personal data. Moreover, Biden, if he fulfils his campaign pledges to challenge shareholder-value-driven US business, act on climate crisis and enlarge union rights, will Europeanise the US economy to make it more friendly to this reform agenda. It will be a sea change – with Britain a marginalised bystander.
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18 Oct 3:30am Why are we so keen to ‘save’ Christmas rather than, say, the sick or the economy? | Catherine Bennett
The Guardian
Whatever the human cost, Boris Johnson doesn’t want to be remembered as Scrooge
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18 Oct 3:00am Being white won’t hold boys back. Being working class just might... | Kenan Malik
The Guardian
It makes no sense to judge the fate of ‘white working-class boys’, a confusing categoryWhite, working-class boys fare badly at school. About that, almost everyone is agreed. More contested is the reason why. Last week, the first witnesses gave evidence to the commons select committee on education’s investigation into “
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18 Oct 2:30am Evensong at York Minster is balm to the soul | Rachel Cooke
The Guardian
Plainsong is the perfect antidote for these troubling times In York for the weekend, we made a point of going to the minster for evensong. At last, live music. But things are not, of course, precisely the same as they were. The service no longer takes place in the forgiving gloom of the choir, but in the minster’s vast nave, the tiny congregation spread out like currants in a
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18 Oct 2:00am Remote working? No, we prefer to keep it close to home | Torsten Bell
The Guardian
A study of mobile phones reveals that most of our contacts still live nearby Everyone is on the hunt for silver linings to this pandemic trauma. Shop closures were going to end our materialism, but we’re
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18 Oct 1:30am The freedom to offend is a priceless commodity | Kenan Malik
The Guardian
The murder of a Parisian teacher underlines the need to stand up for free speech The details are still emerging, but the horror is clear – the beheading of a teacher,
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18 Oct 1:30am May I have a word about… when John Terry got too big for his boots | Jonathan Bouquet
The Guardian
An annexe is one thing but, as the planning officer said, the former England footballer’s extension was too large by half I’m only too happy to admit that planning laws are something of a grey area for me. Take the following verdict, for example, in response to an
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18 Oct 1:15am The Observer view on a Britain divided by coronavirus | Observer editorial
The Guardian
The need for national unity has never been greater, but Boris Johnson’s bungling has fragmented the nation
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18 Oct 1:00am Beware hypocrisy on Nagorno-Karabakh | Letters
The Guardian
The big players should look to their own history of occupation before they criticise smaller nations in the south CaucasusI write as an academic and Anglo-Armenian. Your coverage of the Armenian-Azerbaijani war over Nagorno-Karabakh/Artsakh gave a graphic account of the horrors on the ground (“
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18 Oct 1:00am In the age of Covid, sanctions against ‘rogue states’ just spread the misery | Simon Tisdall
The Guardian
Aggressive measures affecting North Korea, Iran and Venezuela have merely hurt the vulnerable and hardened attitudes
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