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Sunday, March 24, 2019
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24 Mar 3:00pm How to report terrorism: name, but don’t amplify | Paul Chadwick
The Guardian
Jacinda Ardern honorably refuses to name the Christchurch suspect, but the Guardian has decided that the duty of journalists is differentIn one of several impressive acts of leadership, New Zealand’s parliament opened last Tuesday with the Speaker inviting an imam to lead prayers, first in Arabic then English. In Hansard the last of these “verses of patience” reads: “Oh Lord, we ask you to protect New Zealand and the whole world from such calamities. Amen.” Would we be better protected if journalists followed the urging of New Zealand’s prime minister Jacinda Ardern and
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24 Mar 2:58pm Ben Jennings on reports that Michael Gove could act as caretaker PM – cartoon
The Guardian
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/mar/24/ben-jennings-on-reports-that-michael-gove-could-act-as-caretaker-pm-cartoon">Continue reading...
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24 Mar 2:49pm The Guardian view on Conservative crisis: made by Brexit | Editorial
The Guardian
The main political parties are split and unable to contain the destructive fallout of the populist politics of leaving the EUTheresa May has not been honest about the withdrawal agreement she negotiated with the European Union. She repeatedly said it was the only one on the table. She now
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24 Mar 2:35pm The Guardian view on statistics in sciences: gaming the (un)known | Editorial
The Guardian
Statisticians are calling on their profession to abandon one of its most treasured markers of significance. But what could replace it?Statistical arguments are a crucial part of decision-making in a modern society. The kind of decisions that governments and large companies must make all the time are governed by probabilities. In those circumstances of uncertain knowledge we need to reduce a cloud of unknowing to facts as hard and cold as hailstones that can be acted on, or even just used in arguments. But some of the most popular techniques for doing this are now under attack from within the profession. The p value is supposed to measure whether the conclusions drawn from any given experiment or investigation of data are reliable. It actually measures how unlikely the observed result is compared with what would be expected as a result of random chance. Obviously this requires a sophisticated understanding of the results that chance might be expected to produce. This isn’t always available. To take one popular example, any calculation of how
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24 Mar 2:17pm Food banks are no solution to poverty | Letter
The Guardian
Charitable food aid is a sticking plaster on a gaping wound of systemic inequality in the UK and US, say signatories including
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24 Mar 2:16pm Irish language still resonates powerfully | Letters
The Guardian
Colonisers used Ireland as a testing ground, says
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24 Mar 2:14pm Life, liberty and the pursuit of poetry | Letters
The Guardian
Assisted dying | Early female poets | Mary Warnock | National Housewives’ Register | Breakup songsSimon Jenkins (
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24 Mar 1:53pm May’s time is up. She must make way for a caretaker prime minister | Matthew d’Ancona
The Guardian
The last thing the country needs is a Tory leadership contest. David Lidington should take the reins for a limited periodThere is an unforgettable moment in Richard Pryor:
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24 Mar 1:28pm Victor Hochhauser obituary
The Guardian
Impresario and promoter who brought many great Russian artists to Britain, incuding Shostakovich and NureyevThe impresario Victor Hochhauser, who has died aged 95, made possible performances by leading figures of the worlds of classical music and ballet in Britain, sometimes also in Israel and in the former communist bloc countries. Many of them became personal friends. In the decades following the second world war, Victor made it his business, and his pleasure, to bring such great talents to the widest audiences. To that end he ventured behind the iron curtain and to China, opening western doors for performers from the Soviet Union such as
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24 Mar 12:40pm Can we all chill out about pot? Not quite yet | Judith Grisel
The Guardian
Regulation has been unscientific and too restrictive. But the spectre of psychosis means some will always have to be waryOccasionally during my love affair with marijuana I would experience perceptual disruptions profound enough to freak me out. One time I was driving along a crowded road when my car seemed a little wobbly and then listed towards the centre, an alarming thud-thud emanating from the back end. In the middle of a densely populated spot without a hard shoulder, I crept slowly across a few lanes of traffic and pulled to a stop. Concentrating very hard, I got out of the car to assess and hopefully change the flat tyre. I rarely got paranoid from smoking weed; neither did it typically make me sleepy. Instead, I was among the lucky ones, as the drug made everyday activities such as gardening, waiting on tables and talking to my family bearable if not interesting. So I was shocked and embarrassed to find, after a few minutes of close inspection amid the honking horns, that there was nothing wrong with the car. At the time I took hallucinations as evidence of a good score. Now, as an ex-smoker and neuroscientist whose focus is addictive drugs, I know that my resilient response to this stressful experience was contingent on having a neurotypical brain. Neural pathways are forged by finely orchestrated signals for
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24 Mar 5:00am Public intellectuals have never been more vital. Let Mary Warnock be a guide | Sarah Ditum
The Guardian
The philosopher, who died last week, made huge contributions to British life. Why are her successors absent from the national conversation?A couple of years ago, the death of a public intellectual, such as the philosopher
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24 Mar 3:59am MPs must seize control of the Brexit calamity. Mrs May has already lost it | Andrew Rawnsley
The Guardian
The EU has given Britain a breathing space. It is imperative that it is used to find an escape from this nightmareA symbolic casualty of Britain’s rolling, roiling Brexit debacle is the “commemorative” 50p coin bearing the date 29 March 2019, which the government had planned to release. It was one of their more idiotic ideas to put such an item in the nation’s pockets and purses when the country is so divided and its destiny is swirled with such a dense fog of uncertainty. The coin is now as redundant as the prime minister who signed off on it. Britain won’t be leaving the EU to the deadline that Theresa May has held so sacred that she swore she would not be deflected from it on more than 100 occasions. Her inability to meet her own date is one illustration of the failure of her broken Brexit strategy. Another is the heel-stamping manner in which she responded to this latest episode in her thick volume of humiliations. Shortly before she went to Brussels to seek a postponement to Britain’s withdrawal from the EU, the prime minister had a temper tantrum that was no prettier for being dressed up as a
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24 Mar 3:00am To look on the bright side of life, Britain should copy Finland | Rachel Kelly
The Guardian
The happiness report offers doleful Brits wise advice on how we can perk ourselves up How can we be more Finnish? Last week, the
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24 Mar 3:00am Does Britain really want an isolated future, buffeted by forces beyond our control? | Will Hutton
The Guardian
In a world dominated by power blocs, the country would struggle to make its voice heard Leave our shores and Brexit appears even more hopelessly strange – and the people perpetrating it even more peculiar – than they do when you are at home. In Asia, where I have spent the past week, figures such as Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg are seen as curiosities with views that are openly risible. Of course it’s stupid to leave the world’s biggest trading bloc and make your now lonely future dependent upon the kindness of unforgiving strangers. Can’t they see that? No country has ever done what Britain is attempting because it is so obviously crazed. Trade agreements are a carefully balanced mutual opening of partners’ markets with a hard-to-work-through calculus of gains and losses that takes years – even decades – to negotiate. Brexiters promised that Britain would be different and that unravelling a 45-year-old web of deep relationships would be quick and effortless, with Britain “holding all the cards”. All palpably false.
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24 Mar 2:22am The Observer view of Matt Hancock’s cancer gaffe | Observer editorial
The Guardian
The health secretary’s remarks about prostate cancer are the latest in a long line of ministerial blundersWe are ruled by a government that has, in a very short time, acquired a striking reputation for the crassness of its members’ utterances and actions. Examples include Northern Ireland secretary
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24 Mar 2:00am Silencing Islamophobes is as futile a response as banning the Qur’an | Kenan Malik
The Guardian
Much of the reaction to Christchurch has wrongly sought to censor far-right hatred What drove Brenton Tarrant, the Christchurch gunman, to commit his heinous acts? It’s a question that has, understandably, occupied much media space . A key debate has been over the role of anti-Muslim hatred and its entrenchment in mainstream society. In an open letter, Britain’s counter-terror chief, Neil Basu, called out the mainstream media for the
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24 Mar 2:00am Hospital no place for those with dementia | Letters
The Guardian
One of society’s biggest challenges is how to reduce the number of old people with dementia going into hospitalNicci Gerrard writes very engagingly about her father’s journey through dementia with her support in his last 10 years (“
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24 Mar 1:59am ‘For the few, not the many’ still drives Scotland’s schools system | Kevin McKenna
The Guardian
Performance data reveals how much the country still suffers from educational gerrymandering In Scotland, the new middle-class rites of spring are upon us. They may not yet carry the resonance of Glyndebourne, Henley or Royal Ascot but the social and economic implications for thousands of families are quite profound. This is when Scotland’s state school league tables are published and when families begin to inspect university prospectuses and neighbourhood maths tutors start browsing the BMW and Mercedes catalogues. Actually, to describe the state school performance data as “league tables” isn’t quite accurate. Holyrood deliberately avoids arranging this data in a league table format because to do so would be simplistic, entirely subjective and fail to offer a wider picture of a school’s performance beyond bald academic numbers. It’s left to newspapers to arrange them in league table format based on the numbers of pupils from each school gaining A-passes. Thus, we get to see some depressingly familiar patterns emerge: schools in affluent neighbourhoods figure heavily in the top 20 while those in our disadvantaged communities are gathered near the foot.
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24 Mar 1:59am May I have a word about... the many multiple sins against English | Jonathan Bouquet
The Guardian
One of my colleagues is roused to volcanic harrumphing by the tangible outcomes of insidiously intangible infelicities For some people, it’s the little things that truly offend; sins against the English language that cause them to believe that the whole glorious edifice is crumbling. One of my colleagues is roused to volcanic harrumphing by the use of the word “multiple”. He might like to avert his gaze now. “Exercise program provides multiple benefits to nursing home residents”; “multiple churches burglarized in Back of the Yards: police”; “Sussex TK Maxx thefts – man charged with offences at multiple stores”; “Multiple animals killed in South Jersey barn fire”.
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