Back The Guardian Friday, July 20, 2018
Search Sections 20 Jul

The Guardian

Friday, July 20, 2018
Close
Advertisement
20 Jul 1:07pm A plague on Hatchimals, and all the other collectables from hell | Emma Brockes
The Guardian
I refuse to believe today’s coveted toys are just the same as the Top Trumps et al of my youth. It’s all in the marketingIf you are lucky, you live in a world in which the words Shopkins and Hatchimals don’t mean anything. When you go to the supermarket, you don’t pilot a course based on the rigid avoidance of stacks of small, coloured pods, inside which nestle a variety of plastic figures, the opening of which sends small children into a frenzy. The price point of these items – a few quid at most – is expertly pitched to wear down a parent’s resistance. If you have to bribe your child to pipe down, better plastic rubbish than sweets. At least, that’s what I used to think. But this week, after having a mega-clearout of my apartment, I piled up a year’s worth of disposable “collectible” toys, and it was so depressing, so environmentally horrific, that Shopkins and their ilk went instantly to the top of my list of non-Trump-related things to be furious about.
 Like Reply
Currencies in GBP
EUR 0,90 +0,335%
USD 0,77 +0,784%
CHF 0,78 +0,385%
20 Jul 12:48pm For a 21st-century Proms, we must let the people clap when they want | Chi-chi Nwanoku
The Guardian
Fusty, dusty old rules about when to applaud need to be ditched if we’re ever to bring new audiences into classical musicIt’s the World Cup final. The ball has just smashed into the back of the net. But as some in the crowd rise to cheer, the referee orders them to be silent. The correct time to cheer is at the end of the match, he says. The rest of the crowd tut-tut at the transgressors, who clearly haven’t learned the correct way to behave. Sound ridiculous? Well, welcome to the world of classical music.
 Like Reply
The will of the people? These Brexit ideologues are destroying democracy | Jonathan Freedland 20 Jul 12:39pm The will of the people? These Brexit ideologues are destroying democracy | Jonathan Freedland
The Guardian
Vote Leave’s fraud and last week’s sharp practice in parliament show that the Brexit process is undermining vital institutions First, a confession. One that relates to the current threat facing our democratic way of life and which involves a decision I made nearly 15 years ago. It turns on the unlikely name of Brian. In January 2004, I covered for this newspaper the publication of the
 Like Reply
20 Jul 12:29pm The Guardian view on cybersecurity: trust – but verify | Editorial
The Guardian
The use of Chinese-made equipment in Britain’s broadband infrastructure demands, and gets, careful scrutinyHow far can we trust Chinese companies to supply our critical national infrastructure? The question was raised by the Hinkley Point power station, but is even more pressing in the telecoms business. Broadband internet is now as critical a part of the infrastructure as the road or rail network. So the question seems to answer itself. Many countries are extremely reluctant to allow two Chinese telecoms companies in particular, Huawei and ZTE, to do business with them. They view both of them as arms of the Chinese state, even though Huawei is legally a private company. In fact the US government nearly shut down ZTE altogether this year by forbidding its American component suppliers to deal with it, although it was later allowed to resume operations on payment of
 Like Reply
There is no honour in ‘honour killings’, only male shame | Naz Shah 20 Jul 10:32am There is no honour in ‘honour killings’, only male shame | Naz Shah
The Guardian
The global scale of gendered violence, FGM or forced marriage is staggering. The Honour Her campaign deserves your support Saturday 14 July marked the National Day of Remembrance for the Victims of Honour Based Violence, a day established to commemorate the birthday of Bradford-born
 Like Reply
To break the Irish backstop deadlock, May needs her biggest fudge yet | Marley Morris 20 Jul 9:29am To break the Irish backstop deadlock, May needs her biggest fudge yet | Marley Morris
The Guardian
It would heap huge pressure on her Chequers plan. But the alternative is crashing out of the EU with no deal at allTheresa May’s speech in Belfast today has put the thorny issue of the Irish “backstop” back at the heart of the Brexit negotiations. Despite all the focus on ministerial resignations and parliamentary turmoil this week, it is the backstop – more than any other issue – that threatens a complete breakdown in the Brexit talks. The
 Like Reply
Labour’s code of conduct isn’t antisemitic – it’s a constructive initiative | Brian Klug 20 Jul 9:04am Labour’s code of conduct isn’t antisemitic – it’s a constructive initiative | Brian Klug
The Guardian
Critics are preoccupied with the minutiae of the language, but it should be an adaptable living document When two emotive issues collide, the seas of language are liable to run high. This is what happened when Labour announced its new
 Like Reply
20 Jul 7:35am Mobs are killing Muslims in India. Why is no one stopping them? | Rana Ayyub
The Guardian
A spiritual leader was lucky to escape with his life this week. Yet Narendra Modi’s ruling BJP keeps fanning the flamesOn 17 July the supreme court of India condemned the
 Like Reply
Wellbeing is a nice buzzword. But when employers use it, ask why | Emily Reynolds 20 Jul 7:03am Wellbeing is a nice buzzword. But when employers use it, ask why | Emily Reynolds
The Guardian
Poor employee mental health is not treated with the humanity it requires – instead, it’s seen as a risk, or a barrier to profit
 Like Reply
Let’s take back control from this authoritarian Tory government | Owen Jones 20 Jul 6:36am Let’s take back control from this authoritarian Tory government | Owen Jones
The Guardian
The morally repugnant treatment of Jo Swinson is yet another example of Conservative disdain for democracySo now we know what “take back control” means: a cynical, shameless power grab by the Conservative party. Remember all that dewy-eyed rhetoric about restoring the sovereignty of Britain’s parliament? Let me shock you: I’m starting to think it might have been a con.
 Like Reply
20 Jul 6:30am The leasehold system is a money-making racket. Reform is long overdue | Sebastian O’Kelly
The Guardian
The grisly leasehold sector has enriched itself at the expense of ordinary families’ wealth and security This week, the Law Commission fired the opening shot at the murkiest and most lucrative corner of the residential property market:
 Like Reply
Priced out of parenthood: no wonder the birthrate is plummeting | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett 20 Jul 5:00am Priced out of parenthood: no wonder the birthrate is plummeting | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
The Guardian
Deciding to have a child should fill you with joy, not crippling anxiety. The UK is making things so hard for its young peopleSkint people have been having babies for thousands of years. Were the continuation of the human race reliant on parents being in a position of economic security before deciding to have children, we would have died out by now.
 Like Reply
Amazon must be forced to change, for the sake of its workers | Fiona Onasanya 20 Jul 4:58am Amazon must be forced to change, for the sake of its workers | Fiona Onasanya
The Guardian
With 89% of its employees feeling exploited, we see the result of disempowered unions and unenforced regulationsWhile the technological advancements that have brought us tailor-made online shopping at the click of a button is worth celebrating, the delirium that surrounded Amazon’s Prime Day this week has left a bad taste in my mouth. Technological progress brings its own challenges, and the concerns of my constituents who have worked at our local
 Like Reply
The ‘strong black woman’ stereotype is harming our mental health | Marverine Cole 20 Jul 4:34am The ‘strong black woman’ stereotype is harming our mental health | Marverine Cole
The Guardian
The trope of the steely, resolute black woman is ingrained in society, and helps fuel a growing problem with depression and self-harmDepression crept in on me 17 years ago. It was shaping up to be a fabulous summer until my boyfriend split up with me and I was made redundant, in the space of a month. My summer of partying lurched from being fun to being frenzied. I drank and danced the nights away to mask what was really going on. Not telling a soul.
 Like Reply
20 Jul 4:00am 100 and not out: now that’s what I call a cheesy compilation triumph | Fiona Sturges
The Guardian
The Now That’s What I Call Music! collections aren’t cool and they don’t care. Which is why they’re still going strongIs there a more potent way to track the passing of time than through pop music? To cast your mind back to your first ever gig, to that first single purchased, or the tracks that prompted a rush to the dance floor at primary school discos, is much like looking in the mirror and inspecting your latest crop of grey hairs. And so it is when checking out the pop anthologies of one’s youth. Today brings
 Like Reply
Mamma Mia! Here they go again – tourists off to wreck an island idyll | Srećko Horvat 20 Jul 3:00am Mamma Mia! Here they go again – tourists off to wreck an island idyll | Srećko Horvat
The Guardian
The stunning Croatian island of Vis is the setting for the latest Abba-inspired film. Now invasion is inevitable Writing about “film-inspired holidays”, the Observer recently posed the question,
 Like Reply
20 Jul 1:00am It’s never their fault: why the Brexiteers love to cry betrayal | Gary Younge
The Guardian
In Britain and America, the new right is cultivating a dangerous sense of victimhood and shifting blame for its failures elsewhereThe notion of personal responsibility was once such a linchpin of conservative thinking that almost every riposte to liberal ideology ran through it. Whether the right was making the case for longer prison sentences or against the welfare state, the argument generally rested on the principle that we must stand by the consequences of our actions. To cite the context that shaped how a decision was made, insist on the parallel importance of collective responsibility, or expect the state to cushion the blow, were all signs of whiny weakness. To think otherwise revealed not just a flawed political philosophy but a lack of moral fortitude. The world of national sovereignty, racial purity and ethnic homogeneity is not coming back because it never existed
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Wednesday, October 17, 2018

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept