Back The Guardian Friday, February 23, 2018
Search Sections 23 Feb

The Guardian

Friday, February 23, 2018
Close
Advertisement
23 Feb 12:32pm The Guardian view on Labour and banks: not casino capitalism | Editorial
The Guardian
Jeremy Corbyn made a speech criticising big finance and got called a communist. But the Tories appear to have nothing to say about the economic crisis of our timesThere should be no champagne corks popping because the Royal Bank of Scotland has made its
 Like Reply
The Guardian view on tackling sexual exploitation: listening to victims is not enough | Editorial 23 Feb 12:27pm The Guardian view on tackling sexual exploitation: listening to victims is not enough | Editorial
The Guardian
A review of authorities’ response to men grooming women and children in Newcastle shows what can and must be doneThe 700 children and vulnerable women groomed and abused by gangs in north-east England were “harmed beyond imagination”, in the words of one victim. Some showed remarkable courage in giving evidence despite years of manipulation, threats and violence. Their bravery led to the conviction of 17 men and one woman last August; Northumbria police’s
 Like Reply
23 Feb 12:24pm Young people can’t change US gun law alone – but they could tip the balance | Gary Younge
The Guardian
From the civil rights movement to the Florida schoolchildren’s protest, youthful energy has proved a powerful forceIn May 1963 a white police officer in Birmingham, Alabama, tried to scare some black children as they went to protest against segregation. As fellow policemen turned hoses and dogs on black youngsters nearby, the kids made it plain they knew what they were doing and continued marching towards the demonstrations. A reporter asked one of them her age. “Six,” she said, as she climbed into the paddy wagon. Events in Birmingham proved
 Like Reply
23 Feb 12:11pm May cannot lead on Brexit. Here’s Corbyn’s chance to seize the day | Jonathan Freedland
The Guardian
The Tory cabinet awayday produced only meaningless jargon. On Monday, the Labour leader must act like a prime ministerYou’re not being fired. Heavens, no. You and the company are merely going through what we call an “ambitious managed divergence”. The torture Brexit inflicts on the English language escalates daily, the latest indignity being the euphemism coined after the tellingly named Brexit war cabinet had an eight-hour session among the whiteboards
 Like Reply
23 Feb 10:45am What makes young people carry knives? It’s not drill music for sure | Ciaran Thapar
The Guardian
If disenfranchised teenagers feel compelled to arm themselves, we have failed as a society. Their musical taste is not to blameIt is not unusual for teenagers in London to be excluded from school for possession of a knife. In cases I know of, boys have armed themselves after receiving what is known in playground whispers as “the drop”: a threat from a rival group, communicated over social media. When a young person’s education is interrupted like this, it raises difficult questions. Could it have been prevented? How are knives becoming normalised among children? What role is social media playing?
 Like Reply
23 Feb 9:02am How men can show solidarity with the #MeToo movement | Emily Reynolds
The Guardian
Here’s some advice: call each other out, ask women questions and listen. If you do nothing now, you’re complicit Even if you’re a fan of celebrity culture, you probably won’t have predicted that the red carpet was about to become one of 2018’s most visible and widely-reported protests. But it has. It all kicked off at the Golden Globes, with
 Like Reply
23 Feb 8:19am Don’t knock kids for rereading books. Encourage them to read, full stop | Andrew McCallum
The Guardian
A report that claims returning to old favourites such as Jeff Kinney stalls ‘progress’ misunderstands what reading is aboutI get as frustrated as the next parent when my children appear unable to move on to reading pastures new.
 Like Reply
No, Mr Trump, video games do not cause mass shootings 23 Feb 7:00am No, Mr Trump, video games do not cause mass shootings
The Guardian
After the Florida school shooting, attempts to deflect the blame on to video games rather than guns are a jarring hypocrisy With Donald Trump, everything old is new again, it seems. His latest effort to grapple with the
 Like Reply
Tories may face abuse on social media. But try being a feminist 23 Feb 6:45am Tories may face abuse on social media. But try being a feminist
The Guardian
Conservative chair Brandon Lewis believes the right is uniquely victimised online. He’s clearly never seen the alt-right in action Just how tough is it to be a Tory these days? It must be difficult, if you care about the party, to watch it find new and ingenious ways to chew itself to pieces over Brexit every week, but that’s not what I’m talking about. I mean the social stigma. The dinner-party buzzkill. The first-date disbelief. The fact that “It’s harder to come out as being a Conservative than being gay,”
 Like Reply
23 Feb 6:04am Blockchain could reshape the world – and the far right is one step ahead | Josh Hall
The Guardian
Crypto technology is coming to a crossroads. Those who want to use it to radically redistribute wealth must take urgent action
 Like Reply
23 Feb 5:00am Why The Post should win the 2018 best picture Oscar
The Guardian
Ahead of the Academy Awards, Jonathan Freedland celebrates Steven Spielberg’s timely tale of press freedom For a man who is the world’s most successful film-maker, Steven Spielberg has a remarkably thin record at the Oscars. Of course, this points to the perennial Spielberg debate: is his accomplishment chiefly commercial, measured in box-office receipts, rather than artistic? Are his films bankable and crowdpleasing rather than great? Among those who take the former view, the fact that a director first nominated by the Academy 40 years ago – for
 Like Reply
23 Feb 4:29am May is a bystander rather than a player in Brexit’s dramatic collision | Rafael Behr
The Guardian
Abandoning the customs union is uniquely tricky, but delaying the trade bill shows the prime minister is a bystander rather than a playerPolitics is like comedy in two ways: most of the people who think they would be good at it are wrong, and success depends on timing. With that in mind, the decisions by Theresa May last year to trigger article 50 and call a general election, in that order, look like a bad joke. Instead of choosing a destination and organising a strategy to get there, the prime minister went on a clown-car diversion, jettisoning her parliamentary majority and incinerating her reputation as a dependable leader. She didn’t mean to do it, of course. She pursued what looked like political wisdom at the time. And it now hardly matters how the cards might have been played better. May’s most precious commodity was time, and she misspent it.
 Like Reply
23 Feb 1:00am Wine and dine democracy is now on trial – and about time | Simon Jenkins
The Guardian
The Westminster affair shows the potential power of the lobbying industry. Oversight is crucial for all Each time a US gunman goes berserk, the British media erupts in fury at the money the gun lobby can devote to its lethal interest. To be sure, big time lobbying is the occupational disease of American politics. In the US, it can have murderous consequences. Still, on matters of principle, Britons would do well to watch their hypocrisy. The sums spent by property companies on lobbying Westminster city council’s planning committee –
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Sunday, December 9, 2018

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept