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1h 22m Hasan Patel’s place at Eton will help break the vicious circle of privilege | Biba Kang
The Guardian
By taking up a scholarship at the elite school, the 16-year-old is not being a traitor to his leftwing principles When I picture an Etonian, a distinct image comes to mind. I think of a foppish, fair-haired boy, with a country house in one of the more fake-sounding “shires” (“Oh, you must visit our manor in Pompoushire”). I don’t imagine a boy like Hasan Patel. The 16-year-old’s background is seriously unconventional for a prospective Etonian. He grew up on a council estate in east London, sharing a two-bedroom flat with his parents and brothers. His father lived in “abject poverty” in India before moving to the UK. He has spent his young life fighting for change; last year he became the
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4h Can Emmanuel Macron’s ‘great national debate’ save his presidency? | Guillaume Liegey
The Guardian
Talk of tax cuts and curbs to immigration will only go so far – the gilets jaunes protesters need to be listened to nowEarlier this month, in an
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4h I was a natural cosmopolitan. Sweden, and the far right, changed all that | Umut Özkırımlı
The Guardian
A Turk settled in Sweden, I found that the Europe I had sought refuge in was not the Europe I once thought it wasI was born in Turkey and am now based in Lund, on the southern tip of Sweden. Most of my life I’ve probably been the quintessential cosmopolitan, and proudly so. But I’ve also spent too many hours in the consulates and airports of various EU countries coveting a multiple-entry Schengen visa, or enduring the suspicious looks of customs officers, to believe that I could be a “citizen of nowhere” with a Turkish passport. My cosmopolitanism was more a moral ideal based on compassion, and did not preclude a yearning for belonging or roots. It simply defined them in a different way. I could have roots in many places, and I could nourish my need for belonging from a variety of sources.
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4h Panic is on the agenda at Davos – but it’s too little too late | Aditya Chakrabortty
The Guardian
The results of the rampant inequality engineered by the global elite are finally catching up with them Pity the poor billionaire, for today he feels a new and unsettling emotion: fear. The world order he once clung to is crumbling faster than the value of the pound. In its place, he frets, will come chaos. Remember this, as the
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4h Young people look for meaning. But poetry offers our escape | Bridget Minamore
The Guardian
New figures show a dramatic growth in the popularity of poetry among young people. A poet gives her view of the boom
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4h When is it time to call it a day? In this country, we have no idea | Margaret Hodge
The Guardian
Prince Philip’s road accident is a vivid reminder of the absurdity of current rules based on age. They urgently need debate I still remember the frustration I felt as a teenager at the plethora of inconsistent rules that governed what I could and could not do, on the basis solely of my age: when I could vote, marry, drive a car or buy drinks. I am now reaching the stage in life when a whole new set of age-based cans and can’ts are starting to determine what I’m allowed to do.
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15h We’ll never see a cross-party deal on Brexit: tribalism runs too deep | Rafael Behr
The Guardian
Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn are too set in their ways to put country before partyImagination, agility, empathy, diplomacy – all the qualities of an effective negotiator that Theresa May lacks. She was unsuited to the task of getting a good deal in Brussels and now looks incapable of steering a bad deal through parliament. But the prime minister is not without skill. She has an exceptional ability to drain the drama from a crisis, to eke dullness out of an emergency. It is practically a superpower. Only May could make a live broadcast in a drastic breaking-news situation feel as
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15h The Guardian view on Israel’s democracy: killing with impunity, lying without consequence? | Editorial
The Guardian
The late Amos Oz was right to say ‘even unavoidable occupation is a corrupting occupation’. Israeli voters should heed his wordsIn the last nine months of 2018,
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15h Violence in Zimbabwe obscures the potential for a bright future
The Independent
President Mnangagwa should take responsibility for the draconian measures used to quash protests over fuel price rises
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16h Why you shouldn’t post photos of friends without permission
The Guardian
If your friends and family are deliberately keeping themselves off social media - extend the courtesy by asking before you put pictures of them online
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16h Don't plough your digger into a hotel if you haven't been paid – there is an alternative
The Independent
We shouldn't disregard the anger, upset and depression that can result from not being paid. But the best way of getting what you're owed is joining a union
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16h Brexit goes glossy in Wetherspoon’s pubs | Letters
The Guardian
Readers respond to John Harris’s article on the disenfranchisement felt by some leave votersRegarding John Harris’s article (
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16h Letter: Nicholas Crichton obituary
The Guardian
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/law/2018/dec/21/nicholas-crichton-obituary" title="">Nicholas Crichton’s obituary
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16h Jess Phillips' threat to 'make life a misery' for anyone blocking proxy voting shows how much it's needed
The Independent
Voting by proxy will be trialed, mainly because the behaviour of the Tory whips office mean straightforward honour can no longer be relied upon
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16h Antony Gormley’s statue is the new flasher of Folkestone | Brief letters
The Guardian
Healthcare for all | Books | Ofsted | Markeaton footbridge | Antony Gormley | Elderly driversIn 1999, we had a student from Ghana on a summer school at Oxford who needed immediate hospitalisation. At A&E, he asked if they wanted to see his passport and medical insurance. The nurse said: “Sir, all I need to know is that you’re sick.” Let’s keep that kind of NHS (
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18h I left the Women's Equality Party because members were ignored – if it wants change, it should start there
The Independent
Now that WEP leader Sophie Walker has stepped down to 'make space for new voices', the party must take steps to keep as far away from old politics as possible
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19h I hate doing my tax return – but I still love tax | Frances Ryan
The Guardian
Paying tax is deeply optimistic – it’s the idea of sharing our wealth to make things better for everyone I’m sorry if this is rushed. I’m in the middle of my tax return and, frankly, if you’re not a gift aid calculation, I haven’t got time for you. Like many of the UK’s growing number of self-employed workers, with only a week to go until the online self-assessment deadline, I’m knee-deep, trying to get my finances in order. There’s a moment, usually two hours into trying to understand the national insurance classes, that I ponder how easy it would be to ship all my (tiny) holdings to the Cayman Islands. Still, I love tax. In a political era in which the social fabric feels increasingly fragile, there’s something deeply optimistic about the idea that we each pay in collectively to support one another and build something greater than we could alone. In reality, of course, some of us are doing more than others. For some, tax is something to avoid.
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20h How the West let down the people of Sudan – and emboldened regimes across the Middle East
The Independent
The US has come to share Arab regimes' phobia towards street movements of any sort
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20h The British public still have no idea what they voted for with Brexit – it's not elitist to admit it
The Independent
Inviting a largely uninformed public to make a judgement on something as unfathomably complex as EU membership was akin to asking a six-year-old to perform brain surgery – with a crayon
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22h Women were lied to about the pill because a man wanted to please the Pope – what else are we not being told?
The Independent
With a medical research industry as sophisticated as ours, it's a scandal that we know so little about women's bodies
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23h Katie Price is right. Disabled people shouldn’t be forced off the internet by abuse | Gaby Hinsliff
The Guardian
If the social media giants can’t cope with the sheer volume of spite, then it’s down to parliament to protect minority groups What sort of person repeatedly picks on a disabled child in the most vicious and cruel of terms? The answer, of course, is the sort of people the model
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23h Come on feminists, ditch the make-up bag. It's a far more radical statement than burning your bra
The Independent
Women expose themselves to more than 200 synthetic chemicals during their 'beauty' regime. The harms are well documented but largely ignored
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23h I advised the Electoral Commission on Brexit – this is why Theresa May needs a new referendum to pass her deal
The Independent
If voters supported her plan in a Final Say vote, it would be a lifeline that could have the necessary weight to bring MPs on her side
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24h A year ago I was raped. Here’s what I have learned | Anonymous
The Guardian
Since the attack I have experienced an astonishing concoction of trauma, pain and grief. Life is hard, but it goes onOn a grey autumn evening in London just over a year ago, I went out for drinks with a friend to celebrate a new job. Eight hours later I was raped by somebody I’d never met before. My assault happened in late 2017, when the #MeToo movement was still fresh and gaining momentum every day; I felt lucky for this. (Lucky in the way you might feel if you’d escaped a house fire, thinking you were alone, only to find that the people next door had escaped a house fire too.) In the state of shock that followed, which lasted for several months, I became obsessed with this new wave of feminism.
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28h Only empathy can break the cycle of violence in Israel-Palestine | Simon Baron-Cohen
The Guardian
I’ve spent my career studying empathy. It’s a vital first step in conflicts where both sides have dehumanised each other Empathy is all about imagining other minds, appreciating that different people have different perspectives, and responding to their thoughts and feelings with an appropriate emotion. After a career studying autism and the nature of empathy, I see empathy as one of our most valuable natural resources. It has particular promise as an approach to conflict resolution, one that has advantages over viewing a problem through a chiefly military, economic or legal lens. We can see this if we look at the Israel-Palestine conflict, where both communities have different views of the same historic period, both claim the same piece of land and both have valid emotional reactions to the conflict that must be acknowledged. I am not an expert in that dispute nor so naive to believe that there is a single, simple solution to it. But I do believe empathy can help.
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28h Brexit is a mess – what would Yes Minister’s Sir Humphrey do? | Jonathan Lynn
The Guardian
I emailed my old friend and asked what he would do if he were still head of the civil service. Here is his reply “What is the function of the
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