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10h Donald Trump's emergency declaration is flawed, dangerous and a threat to US democracy as we know it
The Independent
Even a cursory examination should be enough to show that the apparent national emergency on the southern border is nothing of the sort
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11h The Guardian view on family law: transparency is in the public interest | Editorial
The Guardian
Children’s privacy must be protected, but the impact of legal aid cuts strengthens the case for openness in courtCuts to the legal aid budget since 2010, coupled with the impact of other spending cuts on low-income and vulnerable people, mean that increasing numbers of people are arriving in court in difficult personal circumstances, having received no legal advice and with no lawyer to represent them. The number of people accessing legal aid fell by 82% between 2010 and 2018. While lawyers, charities and others have repeatedly complained about the impact of legal aid cuts in both civil and criminal courts, and criminal barristers last year threatened to strike, the government has so far declined to reverse the funding decisions taken in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. Last week ministers completed a long-awaited review of the Legal aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (Laspo), and announced it will spend an additional £6.5m on restoring help in a few areas from where it was removed. Given the extent of the cuts – £950m has been sliced from the
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11h The Guardian view on Disney’s Frozen sequel: winter is coming – again | Editorial
The Guardian
The 2013 movie broke box office records and won the hearts of young viewers around the world. But it did so by challenging Hollywood expectationsThis week,
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11h We failed the young on climate change – now we must listen to them | Jonathan Freedland
The Guardian
Greta Thunberg led the way. Children skipping school to protest against global warming is an indictment of adult complacencySuch is the upside-down, topsy-turvy state of our world, that the children are now the adults and the adults are the children. In Westminster, our supposed leaders – men and women of mature vintage – keep stamping their feet and demanding what no one can give them. They insist they should be allowed to gobble up all the birthday cake and still have cake left to eat, threatening to storm out of the European Union and slam the door behind them. As Dominic Grieve, the former attorney general, rightly puts it: “Threatening to leave is the
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11h Martin Rowson on the future and the student climate strike – cartoon
The Guardian
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/feb/15/martin-rowson-on-the-future-and-the-student-climate-strike-cartoon">Continue reading...
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12h Our destiny is in the hands of Rees-Mogg’s unfinished robot sidekick | Marina Hyde
The Guardian
Steve Baker is still claiming the Malthouse compromise, the most ludicrously far-fetched option, is the solution to BrexitWhere are you on
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13h Why do Trump's biggest fans still believe him when he lies? The answer is in the human brain
The Independent
As the president declares a national emergency, let me introduce you to a phenomenon known as the 'illusory truth effect'
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13h The ‘war on drugs’ is causing great damage | Letters
The Guardian
Readers discuss whether the ‘war’ is the right way to combat the violence fuelled by the drugs tradeYou recently set out in detail the catastrophic consequences of the current “war on drugs” (
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13h Sustainability is key to the fisheries bill | Letters
The Guardian
If the government’s plans are implemented, our marine environment will be less protected after Brexit than it is now, say signatories including
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13h UK public pays high price for private schools | Letter
The Guardian
The private school system allows the wealthiest to benefit at the expense of the majority, says
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13h Call for Zimbabwe to halt repression | Letter
The Guardian
Violence against protesters and human rights abuses by government condemnedWe are deeply concerned about grave human
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13h European Research Group members should test what support they have | Brief letters
The Guardian
ERG | National parks | Women’s self-examination | Giving birth | SconesIf the ERG, that party-within-a-party, had a scrap of integrity, its MPs would resign their seats and fight byelections, if necessary as independents (
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13h After today, the damage Trump has done to the US is permanent – there is no going back from this
The Independent
It's often said that Trump is only temporary, Brexit is a permanent, irrevocable decision. But that observation is too simple
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14h AI can write just like me. Brace for the robot apocalypse | Hannah Jane Parkinson
The Guardian
I’ve seen how OpenAI’s GPT2 system can produce a column in my style. We must heed Elon Musk’s warnings of AI doom Elon Musk, recently busying himself with
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14h My generation trashed the planet. So I salute the children striking back | George Monbiot
The Guardian
Across the country today, children left their classes to protest against climate change. This is my message to themThe
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14h Shamima Begum may not have known what she got herself into with Isis, but then neither did Western governments
The Independent
The British and other Western governments played Sorcerer's Apprentice in Syria and ended up failing to get rid of Assad but instead created the sort of chaos in which Isis could flourish
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15h Yes, Shamima Begum has made mistakes – but it's time for this misguided teenager to return home
The Independent
A civilised society should be strong enough to re-admit a silly young woman to return to her birthplace. Is offering mercy and forgiveness such a dangerous tactic?
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15h Attacks on the media show Duterte’s Philippines is heading for despotism | Jo Fuertes Knight
The Guardian
The editor of Rappler, Maria Ressa, faces 15 years in jail, in the most flagrant abuse of the president’s power yet“I will do the right thing,” Maria Ressa, CEO of the Philippines news site Rappler, told reporters as she was led away by police officers having been served a warrant for
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16h Measles is on the rise. But telling anti-vaxxers they’re stupid won’t fix it | Ellie Mae O’Hagan
The Guardian
Simply telling people they are ignorant has failed. We need to find a better way to communicateAfter reading the news that cases of measles have
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16h Call the Midwife takes women’s side over abortion. But the BBC is failing us | Suzanne Moore
The Guardian
The broadcaster’s refusal to provide information on a legal medical procedure shows it does not support women’s choicesCall the Midwife is a wonderfully successful programme, a slice of dramatised social history that centres on women’s experience. It tackles many “difficult” issues: recently we saw a young woman find out that she was intersex, and the introduction of the cervical smear. It manages to be warm and moving, while reflecting the quiet bravery of so many women. A triumph. It is, if you like, always on “our side”. I never thought of it this way before, even though I know the BBC as an institution is not always great for women. It does not
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17h Why the rise of populism in western Europe is more than a 'cultural backlash'
The Independent
Rarely discussed in any depth is the powerful role of economic factors
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17h By pigeonholing Churchill and Shamima Begum we do a disservice to humanity's messy complexity
The Independent
If we can just grit our teeth and engage with the parts of someone's story that conflict with the conclusion we're instinctively drawn to, then the convictions that we emerge with will be gripped with that much more confidence
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18h The arts were supposed to champion diversity. What went wrong? | Clive Nwonka
The Guardian
Arts Council England’s annual report on diversity reveals a sector, despite the rhetoric, still steeped in inequalityIn February 1999,
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18h This angry, embittered parliament has been defeated by Brexit | Anand Menon
The Guardian
Last night’s votes not only failed to break the deadlock – they exposed the bad blood between MPs more clearly than everSo the ERG
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18h Is no-deal Brexit dead? Depends which Tory minister you're talking to
The Independent
Yet something like 600 MPs are against no deal and would dump it tomorrow if they could
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19h The country is stuck between May's bad deal and a no-deal Brexit – a Final Say is our only route out
The Independent
The only way politicians can cover themselves is to say to Leave voters: you said you didn't like our relationship with Europe in 2016; we've negotiated a new one; which do you prefer?
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20h As a former teacher, I completely support the tens of thousands of students protesting against climate change
The Independent
Gone are the days of David Cameron's forays into the Arctic with huskies. The Tories are frankly as environmentally friendly as a dustbin fire
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20h Andrea Levy had to fight for a recognition she truly deserved | Gary Younge
The Guardian
The author whose politics were rooted in anti-racism defined achievement on her own terms
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21h I am taking part in the school climate strike. It’s the only power I have | Rosie Smart-Knight
The Guardian
Today, thousands of students like me will leave the classroom – and make those in charge listen to us on climate changeToday, Friday 15 February, thousands of students from schools, colleges, and universities all around the UK
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23h Britain needs more time on Brexit, but we shouldn’t entrust it to Theresa May | Gary Younge
The Guardian
The prime minister must not be allowed to bounce the country into a version of Brexit it doesn’t want Time, they say, heals all wounds. They also insist that once lost it is never found again because, like tides, it waits for no man. Indeed, of the many things people have said about time, nobody has ever endowed it alone with the capacity to solve intractable diplomatic entanglements, reverse bad decisions or provide an antidote to postcolonial hubris. Time, it has never been said, can find a unicorn. So when Theresa May asks for
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23h Parenting in Manhattan is a Darwinian struggle | Emma Brockes
The Guardian
A slew of new books treats child-raising like another branch of economics that only the fittest will surviveShould we raise children the way we run businesses? I say we, though I have no idea how to run a business. Yet the number of books on the market that discuss parenting in terms one might use to discuss maximising an investment – to approach one’s child as one might any other product launch – is simultaneously completely depressing and almost impossible to resist. Why wouldn’t one want to turn out successful children? On the other hand: stuffing them from the age of three with skills best suited to careers in corporate law is surely an expensive and self-defeating insanity. In a new book,
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