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Why a ‘no deal’ strategy might just work for Theresa May | Abhinay Muthoo and Siobhan Benita11m Why a ‘no deal’ strategy might just work for Theresa May | Abhinay Muthoo and Siobhan Benita
The Guardian
According to game theory, it’s the best option open to her, but to succeed it needs to be expertly executed. Sadly, there’s no sign of that yetBrexit negotiations are complex but, at their core, they are exactly the same as any other negotiation in life. It is in the interests of both players – in this case the UK and the EU – to strike a deal. At the same time, each player has a different view on exactly which deal to strike. According to the principles of game theory, a player will take action in two main areas to try to secure the best deal for themselves: enhancing their “bargaining power” and improving their “no-deal payoffs”. In other words, they want to be as strong as possible relative to the other player and they want to have attractive outside options.
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Escape from Raqqa: how my three-year ordeal in the Isis stronghold ended | Tim Ramadan1h Updated Escape from Raqqa: how my three-year ordeal in the Isis stronghold ended | Tim Ramadan
The Guardian
I had vowed not to leave the Syrian city until the hated black flags came down. Then a chance encounter set me on an unintended path fraught with dangerWe had gathered as usual in one of the
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Let’s stop being so shy about it: there is a Conservative case for redistribution | Nick Denys3h Let’s stop being so shy about it: there is a Conservative case for redistribution | Nick Denys
The Guardian
The systematic injustice we’re seeing is not the result of ‘evil Tories’ wanting to punish the poor. However, the party is entangled in an ideological knot
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Iraq’s Kurds have overplayed their hand. Now both sides must talk | Emma Sky4h Iraq’s Kurds have overplayed their hand. Now both sides must talk | Emma Sky
The Guardian
As Kurds flee the city of Kirkuk yet again, it’s clear that only a negotiated settlement can bring stabilityThis week has seen
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Bombardier’s vulnerability is a bad omen for post-Brexit Britain | Dawn Foster4h Bombardier’s vulnerability is a bad omen for post-Brexit Britain | Dawn Foster
The Guardian
Airbus, not Theresa May, rescued Belfast’s workers. So much for the claims that the UK is a big global player ready for life outside EuropeFor some, Monday’s weather felt like a depiction of a post-Brexit UK: a wind-battered, dystopian hell-scape lit by an eerie red sun, leaving confused citizens feeling for all the world as though they were trapped in a faded sepia photograph. The last few weeks in Belfast offer a less hyperbolic indication of what might befall the UK after Brexit. The announcement that Bombardier’s C-Series jets would be
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Steve Bell on Theresa May and universal credit – cartoon13h Steve Bell on Theresa May and universal credit – cartoon
The Guardian
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/oct/18/steve-bell-on-theresa-may-and-universal-credit-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The head of MI5 has lost the plot. Britain is safer than ever in its history | Simon Jenkins14h The head of MI5 has lost the plot. Britain is safer than ever in its history | Simon Jenkins
The Guardian
Andrew Parker seems to have suffered a panic attack this week. Random acts of terror don’t threaten the UK’s existenceOh my God, the Muslims are going to get us. Watch out. Our national security is “more under threat than ever”. Our lives are seeing a “dramatic upshift” in threat levels, with “plots from overseas, plots online, complex scheming and crude stabbings, lengthy planning but also spontaneous attacks”. MI5 boss Andrew Parker seemed close to a panic attack on Tuesday. He found threats
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The Guardian view on Xi Jinping: the life and soul of the party | Editorial14h The Guardian view on Xi Jinping: the life and soul of the party | Editorial
The Guardian
The Communist party congress in Beijing is all about one man. How he uses the power he has amassed will have an impact far beyond China’s shores“The capability of any one individual is limited,” Xi Jinping
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The Guardian view on universal credit: losing credit | Editorial14h The Guardian view on universal credit: losing credit | Editorial
The Guardian
By refusing to pause and rectify its benefit reform, the government risks condemning hundreds to a Christmas reliant on food parcelsUniversal credit (UC) is a technocratic solution to a human problem. Rolling up six benefits into one payment in a way that mirrors a monthly pay cheque appears unimpeachably sensible – on paper. The system is still supported in principle across the parties. But in practice too many claimants do not fit into its organised parameters. They come with historic debts, or without any savings, or knocked back by the unexpected loss of their job or a split from their partner. For all its flaws, the old system was baggier and more accommodating. And there is a long history of new benefits coming laden with unintended consequences. The former work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith, who designed UC, at least insisted that his system came in slowly, with built-in “firebreaks” to assess the success of implementation and the effectiveness of its design. But his successors have lost patience with testing, learning and rectifying, and now they are refusing to pause.
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The NHS must surely share Richard Branson’s pain | Letters14h The NHS must surely share Richard Branson’s pain | Letters
The Guardian
Money that could be spent on people’s real needs is not being spent on those needs, in Wirral as in the Virgin Islands, says
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In Armando Iannucci’s film, Stalin gets a taste of his own disregard for facts | Letters14h In Armando Iannucci’s film, Stalin gets a taste of his own disregard for facts | Letters
The Guardian
The film The Death of Stalin profoundly encodes in humour the poetics of the tragedy that is Stalin’s evil, writes
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If only spycops were just paranoid fantasy | Letter14h If only spycops were just paranoid fantasy | Letter
The Guardian
It is highly unlikely that police forces have stopped spying on protest groups and politicians, say
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Press regulator Impress is no instrument of the state | Letters14h Press regulator Impress is no instrument of the state | Letters
The Guardian
Impress has been formally recognised as an independent, effective regulator of news publishers by the independent Press Recognition Panel, writes
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Atomisation of society under a chemist prime minister | Brief letters14h Atomisation of society under a chemist prime minister | Brief letters
The Guardian
Margaret Thatcher | Theatre acoustics: anthems and amplifiers | Solutions to table wobbles: tripods and Paddington Bear’s saw | Sean Hughes and Crystal PalaceMike Ellwood (
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What connects rape in war, domestic violence and sexual harassment? Patriarchy16h What connects rape in war, domestic violence and sexual harassment? Patriarchy
The Guardian
Without an analysis of the patriarchy, we will remain powerless to change the abuse of women that is present in varying degrees everywhere Late at night I gaze upon the faces of
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Don’t guilt trip parents about their moderate drinking | Anne Perkins16h Don’t guilt trip parents about their moderate drinking | Anne Perkins
The Guardian
The Institute for Alcohol Studies’ warnings are disproportionate and risk undermining broader health advice. Children are made of sterner stuffOne of the best books my daughters and I read together was
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I've seen how the EU tackles tax evasion versus the US – and if Brexit Britain follows Trump, we're headed for disaster17h I've seen how the EU tackles tax evasion versus the US – and if Brexit Britain follows Trump, we're headed for disaster
The Independent
While the EU looks at ways of preventing tax avoidance in an age of vast technological development and rapid globalisation, the US – under the leadership of Donald Trump – is taking a deep breath before slashing taxes and creating even more tax loopholes
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The Government must take renewed action on the NHS crisis17h The Government must take renewed action on the NHS crisis
The Independent
For doctors and nurses on the frontline, patience is in many cases wearing thin. Instances of emigration and early retirement are commonplace, as long hours, unyielding paperwork and – in some cases – low pay take their toll
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Donald Trump may be about to end Nafta, plunging the US, Canada and Mexico into uncertainty 17h Donald Trump may be about to end Nafta, plunging the US, Canada and Mexico into uncertainty
The Independent
The Canadian foreign minister, Chrystia Freeland, put it this way: 'We have seen proposals that would turn back the clock on 23 years of predictability, openness and collaboration under Nafta. This is troubling.'
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17h Domestikator is nasty public art. The Louvre was quite right to reject it | Jonathan Jones
The Guardian
In a gallery, obscenity is one thing. But in a public space where people of all ages will see it without choosing to do so? That’s bullying The other day I walked into a Brussels art gallery where a
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Give MPs basic rights at work, or Britain’s gender gap will never close | Clare Phipps18h Give MPs basic rights at work, or Britain’s gender gap will never close | Clare Phipps
The Guardian
Parental leave isn’t enough: job-sharing is the only way to make parliament more representative – and the only way someone like me can become an MPAdmitting I am “in politics” is not something I do casually. Why would I want people to associate me with
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18h Rose McGowan’s tweet suggests a poetic justice for Weinstein’s poison | Peter Bradshaw
The Guardian
By tweeting Blake’s poem A Poison Tree without comment after her Weinstein allegations, McGowan has helped illuminate its complex meanings As the Weinstein scandal begins to look like a red pill moment for the film industry – revealing the widespread abuse that was there all along – the most startling intervention came from
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18h At Prime Minister's Questions, Jeremy Corbyn gave Theresa May the hammering she deserved
The Independent
David Cameron's plan to hold a referendum to 'heal divisions' in the party is finally working. Trouble is, it's the wrong party.
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19h The Donald Trump Doctrine: 'Obama built it. I broke it. You fix it'
The Independent
President seemingly hell-bent on trashing predecessor's legacy
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I'm a man who has been sexually harassed – but I don't think it's right for men to join in with #MeToo19h I'm a man who has been sexually harassed – but I don't think it's right for men to join in with #MeToo
The Independent
Yes, I've been sexually assaulted. Many men, especially gay men, have. But it's not a systemic problem we face – not like it is with women
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From her PMQs slip-up to the Universal Credit debate disaster, today has been an embarrassing day for Theresa May19h From her PMQs slip-up to the Universal Credit debate disaster, today has been an embarrassing day for Theresa May
The Independent
Theresa May's position is so weak that her whips are expected to instruct Conservative MPs not to take part in the vote at the end of Labour's debate on Universal Credit
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EU citizens’ rights are our rights too. Tory intransigence is a threat to both | Diane Abbott19h EU citizens’ rights are our rights too. Tory intransigence is a threat to both | Diane Abbott
The Guardian
The EU has offered a fair deal to all its nationals, including Britons who live in Europe. It is in everyone’s interest that this vital issue be resolved at onceThe debate on what are called EU citizens’ rights has become mired in
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When the benefits helpline is free, its message will still be: let them eat cake | Frances Ryan20h When the benefits helpline is free, its message will still be: let them eat cake | Frances Ryan
The Guardian
The universal credit concession is welcome, but policy is still shaped by people who have no understanding of what it’s like to be at the sharp end of itIn the latest development around universal credit the work and pensions secretary, David Gauke, announced this morning that all Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) helplines will be free from the end of the year. It’s remarkable how much pressure it took to achieve this concession. Indeed, from the beginning, the response to news that universal credit claimants are being charged up to 55p a minute to call the government helpline has had an air of “let them eat cake” about it.
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Philip Hammond's survival depends on the success of his Autumn Budget 21h Philip Hammond's survival depends on the success of his Autumn Budget
The Independent
Spooked by Jeremy Corbyn's appeal, the Tories are desperate to woo under-45s. So Hammond will use his Budget to play the generation game
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22h Daphne Caruana Galizia’s murder shows where hatred of the media can lead | Jonathan Freedland
The Guardian
The Maltese journalist whose car was blown sky high was fiercely independent. She was also a member of the reviled mainstream mediaIn the roll call of unfashionable causes, defence of the MSM – the hated “mainstream media” – surely ranks close to the top. Bashing the press is now a guaranteed applause line on both the right and left. Donald Trump, who l
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If Theresa May continues to break her own promise on personal debt, she could end up causing another recession22h If Theresa May continues to break her own promise on personal debt, she could end up causing another recession
The Independent
There is a known solution to this problem – it was even written in the Conservative manifesto. But for some reason, nobody seems to want to implement it
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Kamil Ahmad: failed by the Home Office, then murdered in Bristol | Rebecca Yeo22h Kamil Ahmad: failed by the Home Office, then murdered in Bristol | Rebecca Yeo
The Guardian
Kamil was both an asylum seeker and disabled. That combination would prove fatal as he was let down by the Home Office and the policeKamil Ahmad was
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As a senior doctor, I witness the NHS crumbling on a daily basis – I don't know how much longer it can go on like this22h As a senior doctor, I witness the NHS crumbling on a daily basis – I don't know how much longer it can go on like this
The Independent
Doctors are falling asleep at the wheel, emigrating on mass and even committing suicide because of the stress – if the NHS doesn't start looking after its staff, patients will continue to suffer
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23h Three things that decent men can do in response to #MeToo
The Independent
After this week, you should now understand something of the experiences women go through every day. It's your job to explain it to the men around you
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The ‘Shitty Media Men’ list? We’re asking all the wrong questions about it | Helen Gould23h The ‘Shitty Media Men’ list? We’re asking all the wrong questions about it | Helen Gould
The Guardian
Women have always had informal whisper networks about abusive men. But this public list is a way of women taking control, and breaking the culture of silenceLast week, amid the clamour of yet another
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Theresa May is right on Brexit: no deal is better than a bad deal – for the EU | Jens Geier24h Theresa May is right on Brexit: no deal is better than a bad deal – for the EU | Jens Geier
The Guardian
In the European parliament, we have made it clear that negotiations depend on credibility. The prime minister must start putting the national interest firstBritish politicians and diplomats have been famed down the ages for their negotiating skills. From Robert Walpole to Harold Wilson, British leaders were renowned for knowing how to broker a deal. Today, however, the British government is starting to trash that reputation as it moves from being a deal maker to a deal breaker. As a German I might not have approved of all of Britain’s objectives, but I nevertheless watched the UK’s negotiating triumphs with a sort of admiration. Now I look on in alarm at the unfolding catastrophe threatening to engulf the Brexit talks.
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What is diversity? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Joseph Harker26h What is diversity? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Joseph Harker
The Guardian
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries“Diversity” has become a buzzword over the past two decades. But what does it mean and why is it necessary? To understand how we got here, and where we might go next, it’s worth a look back. Most of us want a fair society, in which the people who are most able, motivated and dedicated are rewarded for their efforts: hardworking families, gifted children, that kind of thing. But we all know that’s not the kind of society we have. In reality, social background, wealth, gender, race and other factors can either enhance or reduce a person’s chances in life. The question is, what to do about it?
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Who is more clever, a teeny-tiny glider or a fancy bird scientist? | First Dog on the Moon26h Who is more clever, a teeny-tiny glider or a fancy bird scientist? | First Dog on the Moon
The Guardian
How can we keep the evil yet adorable sugar glider from eating all the swift parrots? Here’s where Operation PKO and you come in!
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Referendums get a bad press – but to fix Britain, we need more of them | George Monbiot28h Referendums get a bad press – but to fix Britain, we need more of them | George Monbiot
The Guardian
Voting once every five years alienates us from politics. Participatory rather than representative democracy would allow us more say in how we run the countryYou lost, suck it up: this is how our politics works. If the party you voted for lost the election, you have no meaningful democratic voice for the next five years. You can go through life, in this “representative democracy”, unrepresented in government, while not being permitted to represent yourself. Even if your party is elected, it washes its hands of you when you leave the polling booth. Governments assert a mandate for any policy they can push through parliament. While elections tend to hinge on one or two issues, parties will use their win to claim support for all the positions in their manifestos, and for anything else they decide to do during their term in office.
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The lie that poverty is a moral failing was buried a century ago. Now it’s back | Fintan O’Toole28h The lie that poverty is a moral failing was buried a century ago. Now it’s back | Fintan O’Toole
The Guardian
George Bernard Shaw knew that the rich are no better than the poor. But though the argument seemed settled then, it now rages more fiercely than everIf you know Alfred Doolittle only from Stanley Holloway’s infinitely lovable portrayal of him in My Fair Lady, you might not realise that he’s a bit of a monster. In George Bernard Shaw’s original play, Pygmalion, he arrives in high dudgeon at the home of Henry Higgins, who has, Doolittle assumes, taken control of his daughter Eliza for sexual purposes. He is not morally outraged – he just wants to be paid: “The girl belongs to me. You got her. Where do I come in?” Doolittle is a member of the most despised of all social classes: the undeserving poor. He has no desire to be reformed. But he asks – and answers – the most penetrating question: “What is middle-class morality? Just an excuse for never giving me anything.” In the second half of the play, though, the monster who was willing to sell his daughter for a fiver reappears in a silk hat and patent leather shoes. He is clean and elegant. He is getting married. He is now, as he bitterly complains, a paragon of that same middle-class morality. What has transformed him? Money. In an outrageous plot twist, Doolittle has inherited millions and he is now obliged to appear thoroughly respectable.
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UK needs coordinated strategy to tackle knife crime, says MP28h UK needs coordinated strategy to tackle knife crime, says MP
The Guardian
Croydon MP Sarah Jones calls for 10-year multiagency approach to knife crime among young people, similar to one that led to fall in teenage pregnancy rates Britain needs a 10-year, coordinated strategy to tackle knife crime among young people, similar to the successful long-term effort to reduce teenage pregnancy, the chair of an all-party group on knife crime has said. Instead of considering knife crime as mainly a police issue, the government should be bringing together those working in health, education and social media, Sarah Jones, the MP for Croydon Central told the Guardian.
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