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17m The Guardian view on Conservative crisis: made by Brexit | Editorial
The Guardian
The main political parties are split and unable to contain the destructive fallout of the populist politics of leaving the EUTheresa May has not been honest about the withdrawal agreement she negotiated with the European Union. She repeatedly said it was the only one on the table. She now
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31m The Guardian view on statistics in sciences: gaming the (un)known | Editorial
The Guardian
Statisticians are calling on their profession to abandon one of its most treasured markers of significance. But what could replace it?Statistical arguments are a crucial part of decision-making in a modern society. The kind of decisions that governments and large companies must make all the time are governed by probabilities. In those circumstances of uncertain knowledge we need to reduce a cloud of unknowing to facts as hard and cold as hailstones that can be acted on, or even just used in arguments. But some of the most popular techniques for doing this are now under attack from within the profession. The p value is supposed to measure whether the conclusions drawn from any given experiment or investigation of data are reliable. It actually measures how unlikely the observed result is compared with what would be expected as a result of random chance. Obviously this requires a sophisticated understanding of the results that chance might be expected to produce. This isn’t always available. To take one popular example, any calculation of how
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49m Food banks are no solution to poverty | Letter
The Guardian
Charitable food aid is a sticking plaster on a gaping wound of systemic inequality in the UK and US, say signatories including
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50m Irish language still resonates powerfully | Letters
The Guardian
Colonisers used Ireland as a testing ground, says
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52m Life, liberty and the pursuit of poetry | Letters
The Guardian
Assisted dying | Early female poets | Mary Warnock | National Housewives’ Register | Breakup songsSimon Jenkins (
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1h 13m May’s time is up. She must make way for a caretaker prime minister | Matthew d’Ancona
The Guardian
The last thing the country needs is a Tory leadership contest. David Lidington should take the reins for a limited periodThere is an unforgettable moment in Richard Pryor:
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1h 16m How women from Islamic Republics fight gender inequality all over the world
The Independent
In an era of heightened hostility towards Muslims, it's worth repeating that women from Islamic regions can hold positions of power and work and live modern lives
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1h 20m Philip Hammond has seen the light on a second referendum – now parliament must back a Final Say on Brexit
The Independent
Either the withdrawal agreement on the table is a good one or it is not, irrespective of who is in charge in the months ahead. A new PM cannot save this bad deal
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1h 38m Victor Hochhauser obituary
The Guardian
Impresario and promoter who brought many great Russian artists to Britain, incuding Shostakovich and NureyevThe impresario Victor Hochhauser, who has died aged 95, made possible performances by leading figures of the worlds of classical music and ballet in Britain, sometimes also in Israel and in the former communist bloc countries. Many of them became personal friends. In the decades following the second world war, Victor made it his business, and his pleasure, to bring such great talents to the widest audiences. To that end he ventured behind the iron curtain and to China, opening western doors for performers from the Soviet Union such as
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2h Universities are still leaving BAME students behind – and the problem goes beyond Oxbridge
The Independent
As Britain is forced to reassess the frameworks that have hitherto been taken for granted, universities must take stock. Moving towards a new future rests on a commitment to leave no one behind
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2h Can we all chill out about pot? Not quite yet | Judith Grisel
The Guardian
Regulation has been unscientific and too restrictive. But the spectre of psychosis means some will always have to be waryOccasionally during my love affair with marijuana I would experience perceptual disruptions profound enough to freak me out. One time I was driving along a crowded road when my car seemed a little wobbly and then listed towards the centre, an alarming thud-thud emanating from the back end. In the middle of a densely populated spot without a hard shoulder, I crept slowly across a few lanes of traffic and pulled to a stop. Concentrating very hard, I got out of the car to assess and hopefully change the flat tyre. I rarely got paranoid from smoking weed; neither did it typically make me sleepy. Instead, I was among the lucky ones, as the drug made everyday activities such as gardening, waiting on tables and talking to my family bearable if not interesting. So I was shocked and embarrassed to find, after a few minutes of close inspection amid the honking horns, that there was nothing wrong with the car. At the time I took hallucinations as evidence of a good score. Now, as an ex-smoker and neuroscientist whose focus is addictive drugs, I know that my resilient response to this stressful experience was contingent on having a neurotypical brain. Neural pathways are forged by finely orchestrated signals for
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3h The government can give us a temporary prime minister if they want, but only on these terms
The Independent
We've seen close up what happens when a PM acts in the interest of their party and their own career, and it has not been pretty viewing. Let's not make the same mistake again
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5h Yesterday's march proved it: MPs can no longer ignore young people's views on Brexit
The Independent
With politicians too frequently dismissing the voices and priorities of my generation, building up the youth to be a powerful voting block is usually an uphill struggle. Not anymore
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6h With Theresa May's fall right around the corner, this is how to get our country back on track over Brexit
The Independent
There are three things we must do if we want to emerge from the chaos unscathed and, in the spirit of the Put it to the People march, they all involve honest debate
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7h BAME groups are dying over religious falsehoods about organ donation. Why aren't faith leaders helping?
The Independent
Religion and culture overwhelmingly hold black and Asian people back from donating organs. Without guidance from religious leaders, they'll continue to suffer disproportionately low donor rates
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8h The consequences of our blind faith in Artificial Intelligence are catching up to us
The Independent
Slowly but surely, machine learning has been creeping into and helping to shape public policy – in healthcare, policing, probation services and other areas. But are we ignoring crucial questions about this technology?
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8h The Put it to the People march showed the true power of youth politics
The Independent
With Parliament entangled in bitter infighting, and our political system breaking before our eyes, the Put it to the People march showed a different kind of politics. Inclusive, diverse and unifying
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10h Public intellectuals have never been more vital. Let Mary Warnock be a guide | Sarah Ditum
The Guardian
The philosopher, who died last week, made huge contributions to British life. Why are her successors absent from the national conversation?A couple of years ago, the death of a public intellectual, such as the philosopher
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11h MPs must seize control of the Brexit calamity. Mrs May has already lost it | Andrew Rawnsley
The Guardian
The EU has given Britain a breathing space. It is imperative that it is used to find an escape from this nightmareA symbolic casualty of Britain’s rolling, roiling Brexit debacle is the “commemorative” 50p coin bearing the date 29 March 2019, which the government had planned to release. It was one of their more idiotic ideas to put such an item in the nation’s pockets and purses when the country is so divided and its destiny is swirled with such a dense fog of uncertainty. The coin is now as redundant as the prime minister who signed off on it. Britain won’t be leaving the EU to the deadline that Theresa May has held so sacred that she swore she would not be deflected from it on more than 100 occasions. Her inability to meet her own date is one illustration of the failure of her broken Brexit strategy. Another is the heel-stamping manner in which she responded to this latest episode in her thick volume of humiliations. Shortly before she went to Brussels to seek a postponement to Britain’s withdrawal from the EU, the prime minister had a temper tantrum that was no prettier for being dressed up as a
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12h To look on the bright side of life, Britain should copy Finland | Rachel Kelly
The Guardian
The happiness report offers doleful Brits wise advice on how we can perk ourselves up How can we be more Finnish? Last week, the
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12h Does Britain really want an isolated future, buffeted by forces beyond our control? | Will Hutton
The Guardian
In a world dominated by power blocs, the country would struggle to make its voice heard Leave our shores and Brexit appears even more hopelessly strange – and the people perpetrating it even more peculiar – than they do when you are at home. In Asia, where I have spent the past week, figures such as Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg are seen as curiosities with views that are openly risible. Of course it’s stupid to leave the world’s biggest trading bloc and make your now lonely future dependent upon the kindness of unforgiving strangers. Can’t they see that? No country has ever done what Britain is attempting because it is so obviously crazed. Trade agreements are a carefully balanced mutual opening of partners’ markets with a hard-to-work-through calculus of gains and losses that takes years – even decades – to negotiate. Brexiters promised that Britain would be different and that unravelling a 45-year-old web of deep relationships would be quick and effortless, with Britain “holding all the cards”. All palpably false.
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12h The Observer view of Matt Hancock’s cancer gaffe | Observer editorial
The Guardian
The health secretary’s remarks about prostate cancer are the latest in a long line of ministerial blundersWe are ruled by a government that has, in a very short time, acquired a striking reputation for the crassness of its members’ utterances and actions. Examples include Northern Ireland secretary
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13h Silencing Islamophobes is as futile a response as banning the Qur’an | Kenan Malik
The Guardian
Much of the reaction to Christchurch has wrongly sought to censor far-right hatred What drove Brenton Tarrant, the Christchurch gunman, to commit his heinous acts? It’s a question that has, understandably, occupied much media space . A key debate has been over the role of anti-Muslim hatred and its entrenchment in mainstream society. In an open letter, Britain’s counter-terror chief, Neil Basu, called out the mainstream media for the
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13h Hospital no place for those with dementia | Letters
The Guardian
One of society’s biggest challenges is how to reduce the number of old people with dementia going into hospitalNicci Gerrard writes very engagingly about her father’s journey through dementia with her support in his last 10 years (“
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13h ‘For the few, not the many’ still drives Scotland’s schools system | Kevin McKenna
The Guardian
Performance data reveals how much the country still suffers from educational gerrymandering In Scotland, the new middle-class rites of spring are upon us. They may not yet carry the resonance of Glyndebourne, Henley or Royal Ascot but the social and economic implications for thousands of families are quite profound. This is when Scotland’s state school league tables are published and when families begin to inspect university prospectuses and neighbourhood maths tutors start browsing the BMW and Mercedes catalogues. Actually, to describe the state school performance data as “league tables” isn’t quite accurate. Holyrood deliberately avoids arranging this data in a league table format because to do so would be simplistic, entirely subjective and fail to offer a wider picture of a school’s performance beyond bald academic numbers. It’s left to newspapers to arrange them in league table format based on the numbers of pupils from each school gaining A-passes. Thus, we get to see some depressingly familiar patterns emerge: schools in affluent neighbourhoods figure heavily in the top 20 while those in our disadvantaged communities are gathered near the foot.
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13h May I have a word about... the many multiple sins against English | Jonathan Bouquet
The Guardian
One of my colleagues is roused to volcanic harrumphing by the tangible outcomes of insidiously intangible infelicities For some people, it’s the little things that truly offend; sins against the English language that cause them to believe that the whole glorious edifice is crumbling. One of my colleagues is roused to volcanic harrumphing by the use of the word “multiple”. He might like to avert his gaze now. “Exercise program provides multiple benefits to nursing home residents”; “multiple churches burglarized in Back of the Yards: police”; “Sussex TK Maxx thefts – man charged with offences at multiple stores”; “Multiple animals killed in South Jersey barn fire”.
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22h Theresa May has failed to offer sound leadership in this toxic Brexit phase | Phillip Lee
The Guardian
The PM has brought us to this crisis with a series of calamitous decisions How has it come to this? Theresa May and her husband, Philip, have long been friends of mine and I have in the past admired her sense of duty and commitment to her party and her country. So it grieves me that her stubborn choices have left both in peril. At a time when our politics needs statesmanship, not brinkmanship, when our divided people need time to heal and come back together, and when our country needs honest leadership rooted in reality not ideology, Mrs May has embraced division. Rather than providing the calm, compassionate and unifying leadership we so desperately needed after a divisive EU referendum campaign, she rushed to own Brexit. She has clung to power in the process, but she is letting us all down.
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23h Tom Watson defied Corbyn and spoke for millions at the Put It To The People march
The Independent
While Mr Watson's words to the crowds today were ostensibly directed at the prime minister, many of them seemed aimed just as much at the leader of the official opposition
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24h One thing now unites Britons – a sense of national humiliation | Nick Cohen
The Guardian
Europe hasn’t belittled us. Our pitiful state has been inflicted on us by our woeful leadersThe hundreds of thousands marching were patriots. Not patriots of the flag-waving, chest-beating type, but patriots determined to stop their fellow citizens suffering and a humiliated Britain being torn apart. “Traitors”, “saboteurs”, “citizens of nowhere”, “Remoaners”... The right has deployed the language of civil war for three years. The insults carried with them the threat that dissenters would be treated as enemies within, but also the promise and the hope that, left to its own devices, Brexit would restore Britain’s greatness.
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25h How will British museums survive if they subject every donor to an ethical audit? | Mark Lawson
The Guardian
Nan Goldin’s opioid protest campaign means Sackler money is no longer welcome at the Tate, and the National Portrait Gallery is now poorer by £1mConsumers of culture will have been aware of the name “Sackler” above the frame of rooms and galleries in artistic institutions around the world. I remember once briefly wondering, when ducking under such an arch, how they had made the money that permitted such extensive philanthropy. Now everyone knows. The photographer Nan Goldin has advertised demonstrations outside the
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25h Europe can't rely on the US to regulate tech giants like Google and Facebook
The Independent
It would be nice to think that European and American regulators are indifferent to the nationality of the companies they regulate, but I am afraid they are not
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25h Get ready for a new prime minister – but it may be too late for them to save Brexit
The Independent
The Tory party is so consumed by the Brexit crisis that it is not looking for an election winner so much as someone who can hold the party together and deliver a 'real' Brexit
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26h Let’s stop pretending exercise is fun. Like work, you’ve just got to do it | Barbara Ellen
The Guardian
Talk of endorphins simply builds up false expectations of the thrill of working outHere’s a harsh truth about fitness that you don’t often hear – exercise sucks. For some of us anyway. I envy those people I see posting online about their completed half-marathons, with messianic zeal (“I feel so alive!”). For people like myself, there’s no redemptive “endorphin rush”. Exercising is just a repetitive bore to be dreaded and endured. If a Slendertone-thingy machine actually did the same job with electronic pads, as I sprawled on the sofa watching
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26h The recent Lloyds sexism scandal is not surprising – women are consistently degraded by socially acceptable 'banter'
The Independent
The reported pervasive belittling and objectification of women at Lloyds of London reveals an environment that excludes people based on their gender
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26h Don't believe the hype, Isis has not yet been defeated – here's why
The Independent
If the Americans are in fact leaving at last, the Kurds are still going to be betrayed and left to the mercy of their enemies – be this Turkey or Syria
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27h Ricky Gervais offers proof, if needed, that there is life after The Office | Rebecca Nicholson
The Guardian
His new show, After Life, divides opinion, except in my householdI kept walking in on my partner last week quietly crying over the laptop. Not, as might be reasonable to expect, because she is stuck in an infinite current affairs loop, never knowing when she might be freed from the horrors, but because she has been watching Ricky Gervais’s new sitcom,
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27h Today's Put It To The People march is further proof that the tide has changed and Brexit is not what people want
The Independent
The march today shows that the tide of history is turning massively changin – traditional Labour and Tory voters side by side, black and white, rich and poor, every faith and none are saying very clearly that enough is enough
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27h The Observer view: the people have marched; now MPs must take up the challenge | Observer editorial
The Guardian
Parliament has to act now to stop Theresa May’s desperate deal ‘You want this Brexit process to be over and done with.” Last Wednesday, Theresa May presumed to
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30h The Top 10: Anonymous Books
The Independent
From The Iliad to Primary Colors, great works of imagination whose authorship is or was unknown
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30h We need to embrace people who voted to leave if we really want to stop Brexit
The Independent
Our country stands on the edge of a precipice – it is being run by a prime minister who appears increasingly deranged, and who has the arrogance to tell a divided 'British people' what they think
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31h We can march for a new vote with heads held high – Britain was sold a fantasy Brexit and should think again
The Independent
So we are marching not just against Brexit, but we are marching because we are proud of the UK
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32h The 'Put it to the People' march will stomp past Number 10 in a powerful riposte to the PM's grubby tactics
The Independent
Conservative MPs will need to consider very carefully whether they want this particular albatross rotting around their necks for decades to come
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32h Brexit is a hammer blow to Britain's poorest regions – a new referendum would be a chance to start again
The Independent
I will join the 'Put it to the People' march in the hope we can use it as a springboard for a massive shift in investment
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33h I'm marching for a second referendum on Brexit so I can finally be down with the kids
The Independent
Whitney Houston was right, they are the future. And politicians are pushing a vision that would make their future worse
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36h Tottenham Hotspur station? Some hate it, but branding the railways is nothing new | Ian Jack
The Guardian
From Daimler Halt to Singer station, corporate giants of the past left their imprint on the transport networkNames that were once freely chosen – so freely that you hardly gave them a thought – now come with sums of money attached. Market principles operate. In north London, for example, Tottenham Hotspur FC has reportedly gone to considerable trouble and expense to persuade Transport for London to
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36h Fit in my 40s: playground games are stupidly enjoyable | Zoe Williams
The Guardian
We’re playing Donkey Tag and Capture The Flag, it’s fitness by way of playground games These are not my people, I thought. But here I was, in the park at 11am on a Saturday. Whose people are anybody’s, in that kind of scenario? Young professionals, I guess you’d call them, very hale and serious. We were here to rabble, which I’ve decided is a verb because language needs it: it’s fitness by way of playground games. I imagined us all running around chasing each other. Surely in playtime terms, “it” was it? Maybe we’d play a bit of British Bulldog, though I can’t see the fitness benefit in hurling yourself into people. So time has moved on, and now there are a million games, all highly labour-intensive. We stood in a circle to warm up, playing a variant of catch, where the person holding the ball yelled their own name; then after a bit, you yelled the name of whoever you were throwing to. Insanely biased against poor catchers: we couldn’t remember anyone’s name because we’d been too focused on the ball. Yet something flickered inside each one of us, as we passed the final 30 seconds hurling the projectile towards the one guy everyone could remember, because his name was Ben: that maniacal competitiveness of childhood, where you seize the advantage by haring off before the rules have ended. I didn’t know what those other non-Ben guys were called, but by the time we started Donkey Tag, by God I wanted to beat them.
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37h Why I am marching against Brexit today | Andrew Adonis
The Guardian
As Britain’s institutions buckle at the prospect of Brexit, its people are finding their voices at precisely the right timeThe tide is turning and
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