Back Opinion Wednesday, December 13, 2017
Search Sections 13 Dec
Close
Advertisement
8h Steve Bell on Donald Trump and harassment claims – cartoon
The Guardian
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/dec/12/steve-bell-on-donald-trump-and-harassment-claims-cartoon">Continue reading...
 Like Reply

Comments

No comments yet...
Currencies in GBP
EUR 0,90 +0,335%
USD 0,77 +0,784%
CHF 0,78 +0,385%
9h The Guardian view on the Brexit vote: mutiny wanted | Editorial
The Guardian
Parliament has the chance on Wednesday to make certain that MPs can hold ministers to account over Brexit terms. They must seize the opportunityMPs’ debates on the EU withdrawal bill have mainly been serious and often of high quality. Tuesday’s attempts to blunt the bill’s sweeping “Henry VIII” powers
 Like Reply
In Jerusalem we have the latest chapter in a century of colonialism | Karma Nabulsi9h In Jerusalem we have the latest chapter in a century of colonialism | Karma Nabulsi
The Guardian
Donald Trump’s intervention is not a mere aberration. It’s part of the continuing story of injustice in PalestineOne hundred years ago, on 11 December 1917, the British army occupied Jerusalem. As General Allenby’s troops marched through Bab al-Khalil, launching a century of settler colonialism across Palestine, prime minister David Lloyd George heralded the city’s capture as “a Christmas present for the British people”. In a few months’ time, we mark another such anniversary: 70 years since the Palestinian
 Like Reply
10h What David Attenborough should have said at the end of Blue Planet | Patrick Barkham
The Guardian
Like the sea itself, the BBC’s showpiece nature programme was calm, hypnotic and awe-inspiring. But it lacked the grave message our situation demandsWe find the sea a great source of solace and peace. The author Ronald Blythe has written of the sea’s “most wonderful monotony”, which “can drug the watcher into forgetting past, present and future”. Watching
 Like Reply
10h ‘You start to worry it might keep readers awake’: Gary Younge on editing the Bedside Guardian
The Guardian
It’s tough selecting the best articles for the Guardian’s annual anthology, especially in the year Trump took power – but there were many reasons to be cheerful They call it the Bedside Guardian for a reason. Every year we produce a collection, drawing together our best writing and the big stories of the past 12 months, just in time for Christmas. Its ideal perch is not on your bookshelf, but your nightstand table. Not because it will send you to sleep. But so you can dip in and out of it in the evening – flipping between your favourite writers and the coverage of some huge event; rereading at leisure the pieces you enjoyed in haste or enjoying the articles you missed first time around in sections you maybe never read. Cherry-picking from the cherries that have already been picked. As the journalist charged with editing the collection this year, this was a particularly onerous challenge. The 12 months in question do not span a calendar year, but from October to October. In other words, it’s a year that starts with Trump’s election and ends with
 Like Reply
There's a serious point behind all this talk of Snowmageddon, and this is it12h There's a serious point behind all this talk of Snowmageddon, and this is it
The Independent
No longer would unhappy Ukrainians and perplexed Poles end up in Newcastle, as they did on Sunday night, and far fewer holidays and business trips would be wrecked before they began
 Like Reply
There is no right moment for Jeremy Corbyn to break his silence on Brexit13h There is no right moment for Jeremy Corbyn to break his silence on Brexit
The Independent
In his career the Labour leader has never followed in the slipstream of public opinion. This would be a hell of a time to start promoting narrow political calculation over political integrity
 Like Reply
13h The Brexit deal is not legally binding – but politically, it's a different story altogether
The Independent
It is technically accurate to say the new deal is not legally binding, but that would be misleading regarding its political importance
 Like Reply
Is Bitcoin here to stay? After developments this week, I would say so13h Is Bitcoin here to stay? After developments this week, I would say so
The Independent
There are places today all over the world that will accept Bitcoin as payment for goods or services, including a church (St Martin's in Gospel Oak, London) which will take it for charitable donations
 Like Reply
Labour must say it: Britain should stay in the single market after Brexit | Chuka Umunna13h Labour must say it: Britain should stay in the single market after Brexit | Chuka Umunna
The Guardian
Conservative pressure is growing for Theresa May to walk away with no deal. To protect working people from this disaster, Labour must act nowThe Brexit negotiations have thus far amounted to a series of humiliating U-turns by the Conservative government. After 18 months of cabinet disputes and posturing over the terms of the divorce, the prime minister has been forced to drop almost every one of the unsustainable red lines she
 Like Reply
13h Single all the way: why Christmas is the most wonderful time of year to be alone | Lizzie Cernik
The Guardian
Despite what Auntie June claims, festive dating is hell. I’d rather squabble with my parents, stuff myself with pastry and bathe in the luxury of my own companySleigh bells are ringing, and for singles everywhere it’s time to pull out your best lines and start swiping right. The winter “cuffing season”, as it’s sometimes known, sees
 Like Reply
Tory ideology means the NHS will always be underfunded13h Tory ideology means the NHS will always be underfunded
The Independent
Please send your letters to letters@independent.co.uk
 Like Reply
In Venezuela, Maduro’s opponents must not lose faith in elections | Reynaldo Trombetta14h In Venezuela, Maduro’s opponents must not lose faith in elections | Reynaldo Trombetta
The Guardian
After decades of corruption, the president’s threat to ban rivals from elections was met with apathy. But only an honest vote can restore Venezuela’s democracyVenezuelans have all the reasons in the world to be furious and to lose faith in democracy. Those that voted for Hugo Chávez 19 years ago were betrayed by a president that promised to end poverty and corruption. His government proved to be authoritarian and, at best, inefficient, while his successor, Nicolás Maduro, turned out to be
 Like Reply
14h How did I handle casual racism in Los Angeles? Awkwardly | Romesh Ranganathan
The Guardian
I had only just arrived in the US when somebody asked me aggressively if I was Muslim. Perhaps I should have educated him, but why is it my problem when I just want a quiet drink with my mate?I have been in Los Angeles for the past few months in an attempt to see if I can make a career out here. There is nothing interesting to discuss about this vanity project except for the fact that it has made me think I might be prejudiced about racism. Before I first arrived in the US, I had been bombarded with advice from my friends about the nightmarish experiences that anyone brown faces at immigration, and warned that I should steel myself for a thorough interrogation and a cavity search. This turned out not to be the case, as I was welcomed by the officer at immigration and wished well on my new journey. He then started discussing astrology with me, which I couldn’t give a shiny shit about, but obviously had to feign interest to avoid immediate deportation.
 Like Reply
14h Everyone's in favour of regional economic rebalancing for the UK – until someone suggests actually doing something about it
The Independent
Why is the Bank of England's physical distance from manufacturers in the North West, Midlands and North East, not a disadvantage for its policymakers?
 Like Reply
15h Cat Person going viral shows how rare it is to explore women’s interior lives | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
The Guardian
The New Yorker short story encapsulates the dynamics of the #MeToo discussion, where at last the voices of women’s experiences are being heardIt is not every day that a short story goes viral. Indeed, it is not every day that many people pay attention to short stories at all. As a form, in Britain at least, they are notoriously difficult to get published, and their authors are rarely granted the effusive praise that is dished out to the longform novelist. Yet this week, Kristen Roupenian’s first story to be printed in the New Yorker was greeted with unparalleled enthusiasm on social media and off it as well. But why? There are no stylistic fireworks on display in
 Like Reply
16h Labour isn’t flip-flopping on Brexit – this is practical politics | Maya Goodfellow
The Guardian
While the prime minister has been muddying the EU waters, Jeremy Corbyn has been busy forming relationships in BrusselsFor some, Labour can do no right on Brexit. The party has a clear, adaptable position – but in recent days it has, somewhat predictably, been accused of being ambiguous. The party wants “
 Like Reply
16h What men can – and should – take from the viral New Yorker short story Cat Person
The Independent
'It's easier to just say yes' sex. 'I got myself into this and it's too late to back out now' sex. 'I don't enjoy this but don't want to hurt his feelings' sex. These are things women recognise and which we need to talk about
 Like Reply
16h The Tories’ rebranding won’t wash: being green is about more than fluffy bunnies | Molly Scott Cato
The Guardian
It’s all very well for Michael Gove to act as if the Tories love animals but they need to see the bigger picture on fracking, renewables and ecologyUp to their necks in Brexit chaos and with Corbyn’s Labour snapping at their heels, the Tories are trying again with a somewhat tired strategy to escape the label of the “nasty party”. They are having another go at acting like environmentalists, this time combining it with being nice to animals. At the helm of this
 Like Reply
17h Online abuse must be curbed. But who decides where the line is drawn? | Owen Jones
The Guardian
While rightwing papers call for better regulation of social media, history shows us that when such crackdowns happen it is often the left that suffers the mostFew would deny the importance of tackling online hatred or child abuse content. The internet, after all, has become a key weapon for those who disseminate and incite hatred and violence against minorities, and for those who pose a horrifying threat to children. It is difficult, though, not to feel discomfort about three rightwing newspapers – the Sun, the Daily Mail and the Times – all leading on the perils of social media.
 Like Reply
Why the robin needs to be pushed off its snowy Christmas card perch | Richard Smyth19h Why the robin needs to be pushed off its snowy Christmas card perch | Richard Smyth
The Guardian
Its red breast may look pretty and festive, but there are many less vicious, needy birds with better credentials for cute Crimbo poses. Here are some suggestionsWe all know by now that robins are outright beasts.
 Like Reply
Why sexual harassment should be treated as a hate crime20h Why sexual harassment should be treated as a hate crime
The Independent
Misogyny is hatred. Time to start fighting it that way
 Like Reply
I’ve watched Prince in Sign o’ the Times 156 times. Is that wrong? | Nell Frizzell21h I’ve watched Prince in Sign o’ the Times 156 times. Is that wrong? | Nell Frizzell
The Guardian
I know I’m not alone in savouring the ritualistic joy of rewatching films. They become part of your interior landscape, and can provide your best quotesAs a long-haired, Lycra-clad Prince proclaimed in 1990, there’s joy in repetition. Oh yes, there’s
 Like Reply
23h Haringey council taken over by Momentum? It’s just locals taking back control | Aditya Chakrabortty
The Guardian
This isn’t a hard left plot: Labour members simply opposed a council that handed its assets to private interests and turfed poor people out of their homes I’ve just been reading about the most terrifying place. For weeks, this “toxic” neighbourhood with its “poisonous” atmosphere has been all over the front pages and columns. It’s a land of revolutionary politics, of “ruthless attacks” and “purges”. Hordes of Trotskyists reportedly roam its high streets – like wildebeest, if they only swapped the majesty of the Serengeti for suburban pound shops. It sounds, frankly, dreadful. It also happens to be right next door to where I was born and raised. Indeed, it’s where I’ve spent much of the past year reporting, on exactly the local politics that now jostles news of Meghan and Harry’s engagement on the front page of the Times. Which is how I know that the fantasies generated by the Murdoch papers and others are just those: a purpose-built media onslaught.
 Like Reply
11 Dec 7:00pm Theresa May: It’s Britain’s duty to help nations hit by climate change
The Guardian
The benefits of clean growth lay at the heart of our industrial strategy. But we must be at the forefront of the effort to keep global temperature rises at manageable levels Tackling climate change and mitigating its effects for the world’s poorest are among the most critical challenges the world faces. That is why I will join other world leaders gathering in Paris today for the
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Wednesday, December 13, 2017

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept