Back Opinion Monday, November 19, 2018
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18m What my new grandchild has taught me about love – and parenting trends
The Guardian
Child-rearing rules have changed so much that I’ve been asked to watch YouTube tutorials by his anxious parentsI can hear him shrieking upstairs as I write. It’s his new thing – a sort of shouting. Every day there is a new thing. Every day he changes. Lights and the colour red seem to excite him beyond all else. They make his legs go berserk, like a tiny Irish dancer. It’s such a long time since I lived with a baby, so I am learning all over again. My daughter and her boyfriend didn’t plan on living with me but they have been. No one needs a lecture on the housing situation in London. It’s tough. It’s even tougher with a kid. So here we all are under one roof, but at entirely different stages of our lives. The labour happened here and they didn’t even wake me up. When they went off to the hospital, I texted to see if they had managed to park OK. Parking I hear is an issue. A picture of a tiny creature was texted back; he was nearly born in the car park.
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47m Don’t blame the Irish: the Brexit chaos is all about England | Fintan O’Toole
The Guardian
The rise of English nationalism has left Britain deeply uncertain about its identity and place in the worldBrexit has been derailed, as it was always going to be, by the Irish question. And, amid the chaos, there is something oddly comfortable about this. Isn’t that what the bloody Irish always do – disrupt an otherwise placid British polity with their hopelessly convoluted and unresolvable feuds? In 1922, reflecting on the way Ireland had dominated imperial politics even on the eve of the great catastrophe of the first world war, a rueful
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1h 14m Theresa May: how dare you say we EU nationals ‘jumped the queue’? | Mimi Mollica
The Guardian
I used to love the fact I lived in a country that recognised how surreal Italian politics was. Now all I feel is disappointmentBritain is now in panic mode, held hostage by a foolish plan gone really really bad. Theresa May has been cornered by her own party, which is
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1h 39m Everyone's united against Theresa May yet she's never seemed so upbeat. When you think about it, the reason is clear
The Independent
These were meant to be the impossible hours. But the own magnificent crapness of her rivals have turned them into a cakewalk – and now it looks like the Brexiteers might end up destroying Brexit
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2h Boris Johnson's water cannon just cost us £300,000 – and that's not the only time he's burnt through taxpayers' money
The Independent
Why is he so fiscally careless? Because he's never experienced the financial fallout of an ill thought through policy
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2h We can only hope Hunt does a better job than his predecessor in Iran
The Independent
The foreign secretary may not be able to do much worse than Boris Johnson, but like the man before him faces an uphill struggle to have Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe released
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2h Why should feminists have to apologise for Sheryl Sandberg's actions?
The Independent
In making Facebook's chief operating officer's failings a 'feminist issue', we risk further marginalising those doing the mundane work of scrounging for cash, mounting legal challenges, gathering statistics on inequality and setting up discreet support networks
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2h Attenborough’s suffering penguin mothers had me in blizzards of tears | Suzanne Moore
The Guardian
I know I should be thinking of the polar ice caps melting on Dynasties, but it was the birds huddling together that got meAfter Louis Theroux’s documentary on assisted dying, there was a helpline number to call. He had dealt sensitively with the dying and those who wanted to. But I was already wrung out as I had watched
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4h When the UN says British austerity is misogynistic, we should listen
The Independent
The Work and Pensions Committee have heard copious evidence on the consequences of Universal Credit for domestic abuse victims, yet still refuse to do anything about it
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5h Struggling to lose weight? It’s not your fault – blame your friends | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
The Guardian
I’m an impressionable eater – like many others. New research throws light on why we might opt for the unhealthy choiceAs we approach Christmas party time, I make my usual annual psychological commitment: time to get healthy, I tell myself, so that December’s excess doesn’t have too much of an impact on my waistline. I vouch to get off the sauce, get on the exercise bike a bit more, stop eating so much cheese. Somehow, I decide, this will result in a new, fit, lithe me. But there is a problem. The problem is that I made this vow in the summer, too, in the run-up to the summer holiday; and in the spring, in the run-up to my book coming out; and in January … you see where this is going. Every month, every week, a meaningless commitment that I believe will change my life. Spoiler alert: it never does.
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5h This International Men's Day, us men have some demands – starting with making half our MPs male
The Independent
More male judges and QCs would surely put a stop to men getting barracked by feminazi barristers. And would it kill you to stop judging us for growing out our natural body hair: our beards?
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6h What May should have said to business: where have all the remainers gone? | Simon Jenkins
The Guardian
Hard Brexit has been making all the running while businesses that were supposed to be united against cutting ties with Europe have been silentIt’s been the silence of the lambs.
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6h I was on holiday during the Brexit chaos – what did I miss?
The Independent
Our cab driver could talk of nothing else on the way back from the airport and by the time we got home, I felt like I was drowning in it all over again
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7h Recoiling at Sainsbury's edible insects is classic Western supremacy
The Independent
For example, cows are sacred in India, the world's second most populous country, but that doesn't stop us from ordering them rare with a side of peppercorn sauce and fries
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7h Will the Daily Mail and the Daily Express secure Theresa May's leadership and a soft Brexit?
The Independent
The prospect of a Labour government led by Jeremy Corbyn is something which worries all Conservative-supporting newspapers, whatever they think about the PM's Brexit deal
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7h If Britain truly wants peace in Yemen it needs to hold Saudi Arabia accountable
The Independent
Our presentation of a draft resolution to the UN security council on a truce in Yemen could be monumental, but only if the government proactively condemns Saudi Arabia's role in fuelling the humanitarian crisis
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7h There’s a Christmas crisis going on: no one wants to kill your dinner | Chas Newkey-Burden
The Guardian
People don’t want to work in abattoirs any more. The industry is linked to psychological and physical damage Christmas is coming and the goose is getting fat. But this year, there might not be anyone to kill her. As British families start to plan their festive dinners of turkey and pigs in blankets, there is a crisis in the meat industry. A report in the trade magazine Farmers Weekly has revealed that
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8h I run a feminist group, but today I am celebrating International Men’s Day | Carys Afoko
The Guardian
We rarely tell positive stories about men and it’s time we stopped being part of a culture that vilifies them Today is
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9h David Hockney’s $90.3m painting reminds us what great art looks like | Jonathan Jones
The Guardian
The record-breaking Portrait of an Artist, painted in 1972, speaks from the heart. Not enough newer work does the same Bittersweet – you don’t really know what that word means until you have contemplated David Hockney’s 1972 Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures). This painting is a calm distillation of love and sorrow, a sad song about a broken heart – and that heart was Hockney’s.
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11h Brexit is a class betrayal. So why is Labour colluding in it? | John Harris
The Guardian
The Tory leave elite is dragging the country towards a disaster that the opposition could still avert by calling for a people’s vote Over the past two and a half years, while the most vocal leave and remain campaigners have endlessly yelled at each other, Brexit has often presented itself as a case study in contradiction and complexity. Certainly, whenever I have spent time in
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11h Poverty exists. Shooting the UN messenger won’t erase that fact | Nesrine Malik
The Guardian
The government can’t go on dismissing evidence that its policies create a two-tier society with deepening divisionsWhen the then UN special rapporteur on violence against women, Rashida Manjoo, visited the UK in April 2014, she had strong words of
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11h When a woman sought justice on harassment, the Lords closed ranks | Kate Maltby
The Guardian
Jasvinder Sanghera has spent her life fighting sexual abuse. But the upper house has shielded Lord Lester from punishmentWhen the #MeToo movement hit Westminster last year, some didn’t see what all the fuss was about. Those of us who had put our names to
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22h Ben Jennings on Theresa May and the Tory rebels – cartoon
The Guardian
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2018/nov/18/ben-jennings-on-theresa-may-and-the-tory-rebels-cartoon">Continue reading...
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22h Updated Beware the statistics that pop up in more than one story | Paul Chadwick
The Guardian
One reader’s query about Russian expats underlines the problem with quoting insufficiently examined figuresStatisics can get lodged in media archives, useful and used often, until they become like grit in mortar – an unnoticed ingredient. But every now and then one of these statistics assumes a significance that draws attention to the issue of its accuracy. A recent report by the neoconservative thinktank the Henry Jackson Society attracted some publicity with its claim that “out of an estimated population of 150,000 Russian ex-pats living in London”, up to half were “said to be” informants for Russian intelligence agencies – “potentially, some 75,000 assets”. I leave to others an analysis of the one-in-every-two estimate. The focus here is the 150,000 figure. The sole source cited in the society’s report for that number was an article from the Observer in April 2014 headed “How the Ukraine crisis is affecting Russians in Moscow-on-Thames”, available in the joint Guardian and Observer online archive.
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23h The Guardian view on poverty in Britain: not just shocking but shameful | Editorial
The Guardian
The report of the UN poverty envoy exposes the grim toll of austerityTruth alone is not enough. It has been only too easy for campaigners and experts to amass abundant evidence of the damage wrought by
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23h The Guardian view on Brexit delusions: the EU27 have a say, too | Editorial
The Guardian
The draft withdrawal agreement has not shaken but hardened the wishful thinking of leaversBritain’s
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23h MPs like David Davis have no idea what fresh hell Brexit will land us in – the posturing needs to stop
The Independent
The former Brexit secretary doesn't know the difference between negotiating on behalf of the government, and being a fantasist. What offers him hope is that so many fellow Tory MPs are equally delusional
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24h Justice for Colombia peace negotiator | Letters
The Guardian
MPs and trades union officials call for Jesús Santrich’s rights to be restored and ask the UK government to support Colombia in implementing the peace deal with Farc rebelsWe are concerned at the recent admission by Colombia’s attorney general that his office does not have evidence against the Farc peace negotiator and congressman-elect Jesús Santrich, who has been imprisoned since 9 April. A recent delegation of British MPs, trade union leaders and lawyers visited Mr Santrich in his cell and was shocked at the conditions. Due to poor conditions and a 41-day hunger strike, his health has deteriorated sharply.
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24h Trade deals are helpful, but Britain's focus should be on remaining an outward-looking economy post-Brexit
The Independent
The important thing to be clear about Brexit is that while trade deals are indeed an asset, and it is encouraging that our largest market, the US, seems to want to do one with us, ultimately what matters is the quality of what we produce
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24h A Tory leadership contest won’t solve the Brexit crisis | Matthew d’Ancona
The Guardian
As the UK’s future hangs in the balance, the Tories are caught in a futile tussle. Only a people’s vote can save our democracyWhen they go low, we go high.” The publication of
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24h Tunisia's arbitrary travel and security restrictions have gone too far – I should know, I was just detained
The Independent
The increasing dominance of Tunisia's security sector isn't just about delays at the airport. It's imperilling what drove many young people to the streets in 2011 – throwing into doubt the nature of the state entirely
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25h The gangs matrix has trapped Britain's young black men in a feedback loop of bad policing – and that's bad for everyone
The Independent
The police's database may not directly affect all of us – but for those listed on it, it further entrenches historical patterns of social and institutional estrangement
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26h Why we need to put mental and physical first aid on an equal footing
The Independent
Private and public sector employers alike are waking up to the reality that neglecting their people's mental health is costing them dear – in staff retention, productivity, and sickness absence
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28h Theresa May's so-called toughness would be easier to applaud if she took Brexit to the people once more
The Independent
The prime minister could, and should, have the courage to take her deal to the people and have it subjected to full on public scrutiny and a vote. Who knows? She could emerge victorious
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29h There's no nuance in the gender equality debate – if we're going to right the balance, that needs to change now
The Independent
Understanding the pay gap through the criteria of gender alone is reductive, and homogenising the experiences of working women does nothing except further inequality
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30h No Donald Trump, we are not going to have 'great climate' – but it's true that poor forest management has helped to fan California's wildfires
The Independent
As the forest service, fire managers and academics have been crying out loud for years, money could be spent much more effectively is in fire preparedness and mitigation
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30h Don't be surprised by the £5m 'golden goodbye' to the Premier League's boss – it's business as usual
The Independent
The Premier League has, predictably, highlighted all the blockbuster broadcast deals Richard Scudamore oversaw while he was in charge as context for their generosity. But how much of that was personally due to him, rather than the environment in which he worked?
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30h Patriotism is meaningless if it doesn’t embrace acts of defiance | Kenan Malik
The Guardian
Emmanuel Macron was wrong to see love of country as chiefly a gentle sentiment Nationalism, the French president Emmanuel Macron suggested at last week’s
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31h The idea of deep continuity in British history is absurd. We’ve always been in flux | David Edgerton
The Guardian
Looking to our past for guidance is a big mistake – we’re no longer the nation of the Second World War or Suez There is something ridiculous about Brexit Britain. It is a
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33h Mrs May has put her cards on the table. Now it’s everyone else’s turn | Andrew Rawnsley
The Guardian
The prime minister has made her choices. Others will have to take responsibility for fateful decisions of their own The eye is supposed to be the calmest place in a storm. Weird as this may seem, the most tranquil person in British politics this weekend is probably Theresa May. This is not the same as saying that she is in a good place. Bits of her government keep falling off, like a decaying gothic folly shedding masonry. Even discounting for the tendency of the Brexit ultras to brag up their strength, a full-frontal attempt to oust her is more likely than at any time in her beleaguered premiership. A confidence ballot of Tory MPs could happen as early as this week.
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35h Letters: nuclear energy is key to our future
The Guardian
With demand for electricity set to rocket, the UK cannot rely on renewables alone Your business leader misses the bigger picture, as indeed do other supporters of renewable energy, such as Greenpeace (“
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35h May I have a word about… football, data analysis and donkeys | Jonathan Bouquet
The Guardian
Today’s Premier League managers put their faith in data quality analysts. Give me an old-school scout any day Oh, for the days when football was a much simpler game. I’ve mentioned before
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35h Enough of the neurosexist bilge. It’s not all pink and blue when it comes to our brains | Catherine Bennett
The Guardian
There’s no genetic reason women should be disadvantaged in the workplace – unless someone is looking for it In a week of dismaying news, there was a ray of sunshine: a scientific breakthrough with the potential to change lives. Men and women’s brains have finally been proved, by actual scientists, in a massive study, to be completely different! This, you gathered, was the substance of a prominently reported new study that made the front page of the
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35h Stand up and be counted if you want to start a debate | Kenan Malik
The Guardian
Controversial ideas are fine, but don’t do it anonymously Do academics need a journal that allows them to publish papers anonymously? The proposed
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35h Online abuse is a tawdry attempt to limit what we say | Carole Cadwalladr
The Guardian
Being called a ‘crazy cat woman’ was an attempt to control and shame. It won’t work Words aren’t cheap, they’re free. And in this age – of Facebook, of Twitter – they travel far and fast. Words that are intended to wound or damage are tossed off in the blink of an eye, tapped out in a few seconds flat, on a keyboard, or a phone, and then – press send, hit return, whoosh, they’re gone. Except they’re not. They circulate forever. Their impact goes on. As I discovered on Tuesday morning. I stepped off a flight from Stockholm, turned on my phone and saw half a dozen messages with screenshots of a now-deleted tweet. It was from
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35h Every time a word disappears, we lose a little of our spirit and wit | Rachel Cooke
The Guardian
A new book gathers words that face extinction. Surely they’re worth saving News stories about language and the way we use it are rarely edifying, and usually intensely vexatious: the custodians of grammar merrily set about their showing off; the more liberal-minded do their best to convince us that the likes of “
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35h America’s opioid crisis is a warning to the NHS | Chris McGreal
The Guardian
The US watchdog that is supposed to protect patients is in thrall to an industry profiting from addiction Years into America’s
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