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1h 4m Steve Bell on Donald Trump and harassment claims – cartoon
The Guardian
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2h The Guardian view on the Brexit vote: mutiny wanted | Editorial
The Guardian
Parliament has the chance on Wednesday to make certain that MPs can hold ministers to account over Brexit terms. They must seize the opportunityMPs’ debates on the EU withdrawal bill have mainly been serious and often of high quality. Tuesday’s attempts to blunt the bill’s sweeping “Henry VIII” powers
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In Jerusalem we have the latest chapter in a century of colonialism | Karma Nabulsi2h In Jerusalem we have the latest chapter in a century of colonialism | Karma Nabulsi
The Guardian
Donald Trump’s intervention is not a mere aberration. It’s part of the continuing story of injustice in PalestineOne hundred years ago, on 11 December 1917, the British army occupied Jerusalem. As General Allenby’s troops marched through Bab al-Khalil, launching a century of settler colonialism across Palestine, prime minister David Lloyd George heralded the city’s capture as “a Christmas present for the British people”. In a few months’ time, we mark another such anniversary: 70 years since the Palestinian
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2h What David Attenborough should have said at the end of Blue Planet | Patrick Barkham
The Guardian
Like the sea itself, the BBC’s showpiece nature programme was calm, hypnotic and awe-inspiring. But it lacked the grave message our situation demandsWe find the sea a great source of solace and peace. The author Ronald Blythe has written of the sea’s “most wonderful monotony”, which “can drug the watcher into forgetting past, present and future”. Watching
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3h ‘You start to worry it might keep readers awake’: Gary Younge on editing the Bedside Guardian
The Guardian
It’s tough selecting the best articles for the Guardian’s annual anthology, especially in the year Trump took power – but there were many reasons to be cheerful They call it the Bedside Guardian for a reason. Every year we produce a collection, drawing together our best writing and the big stories of the past 12 months, just in time for Christmas. Its ideal perch is not on your bookshelf, but your nightstand table. Not because it will send you to sleep. But so you can dip in and out of it in the evening – flipping between your favourite writers and the coverage of some huge event; rereading at leisure the pieces you enjoyed in haste or enjoying the articles you missed first time around in sections you maybe never read. Cherry-picking from the cherries that have already been picked. As the journalist charged with editing the collection this year, this was a particularly onerous challenge. The 12 months in question do not span a calendar year, but from October to October. In other words, it’s a year that starts with Trump’s election and ends with
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There's a serious point behind all this talk of Snowmageddon, and this is it4h There's a serious point behind all this talk of Snowmageddon, and this is it
The Independent
No longer would unhappy Ukrainians and perplexed Poles end up in Newcastle, as they did on Sunday night, and far fewer holidays and business trips would be wrecked before they began
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There is no right moment for Jeremy Corbyn to break his silence on Brexit5h There is no right moment for Jeremy Corbyn to break his silence on Brexit
The Independent
In his career the Labour leader has never followed in the slipstream of public opinion. This would be a hell of a time to start promoting narrow political calculation over political integrity
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5h The Brexit deal is not legally binding – but politically, it's a different story altogether
The Independent
It is technically accurate to say the new deal is not legally binding, but that would be misleading regarding its political importance
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Is Bitcoin here to stay? After developments this week, I would say so6h Is Bitcoin here to stay? After developments this week, I would say so
The Independent
There are places today all over the world that will accept Bitcoin as payment for goods or services, including a church (St Martin's in Gospel Oak, London) which will take it for charitable donations
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Labour must say it: Britain should stay in the single market after Brexit | Chuka Umunna6h Labour must say it: Britain should stay in the single market after Brexit | Chuka Umunna
The Guardian
Conservative pressure is growing for Theresa May to walk away with no deal. To protect working people from this disaster, Labour must act nowThe Brexit negotiations have thus far amounted to a series of humiliating U-turns by the Conservative government. After 18 months of cabinet disputes and posturing over the terms of the divorce, the prime minister has been forced to drop almost every one of the unsustainable red lines she
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6h Single all the way: why Christmas is the most wonderful time of year to be alone | Lizzie Cernik
The Guardian
Despite what Auntie June claims, festive dating is hell. I’d rather squabble with my parents, stuff myself with pastry and bathe in the luxury of my own companySleigh bells are ringing, and for singles everywhere it’s time to pull out your best lines and start swiping right. The winter “cuffing season”, as it’s sometimes known, sees
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Tory ideology means the NHS will always be underfunded6h Tory ideology means the NHS will always be underfunded
The Independent
Please send your letters to letters@independent.co.uk
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In Venezuela, Maduro’s opponents must not lose faith in elections | Reynaldo Trombetta6h In Venezuela, Maduro’s opponents must not lose faith in elections | Reynaldo Trombetta
The Guardian
After decades of corruption, the president’s threat to ban rivals from elections was met with apathy. But only an honest vote can restore Venezuela’s democracyVenezuelans have all the reasons in the world to be furious and to lose faith in democracy. Those that voted for Hugo Chávez 19 years ago were betrayed by a president that promised to end poverty and corruption. His government proved to be authoritarian and, at best, inefficient, while his successor, Nicolás Maduro, turned out to be
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6h How did I handle casual racism in Los Angeles? Awkwardly | Romesh Ranganathan
The Guardian
I had only just arrived in the US when somebody asked me aggressively if I was Muslim. Perhaps I should have educated him, but why is it my problem when I just want a quiet drink with my mate?I have been in Los Angeles for the past few months in an attempt to see if I can make a career out here. There is nothing interesting to discuss about this vanity project except for the fact that it has made me think I might be prejudiced about racism. Before I first arrived in the US, I had been bombarded with advice from my friends about the nightmarish experiences that anyone brown faces at immigration, and warned that I should steel myself for a thorough interrogation and a cavity search. This turned out not to be the case, as I was welcomed by the officer at immigration and wished well on my new journey. He then started discussing astrology with me, which I couldn’t give a shiny shit about, but obviously had to feign interest to avoid immediate deportation.
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7h Everyone's in favour of regional economic rebalancing for the UK – until someone suggests actually doing something about it
The Independent
Why is the Bank of England's physical distance from manufacturers in the North West, Midlands and North East, not a disadvantage for its policymakers?
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8h Cat Person going viral shows how rare it is to explore women’s interior lives | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
The Guardian
The New Yorker short story encapsulates the dynamics of the #MeToo discussion, where at last the voices of women’s experiences are being heardIt is not every day that a short story goes viral. Indeed, it is not every day that many people pay attention to short stories at all. As a form, in Britain at least, they are notoriously difficult to get published, and their authors are rarely granted the effusive praise that is dished out to the longform novelist. Yet this week, Kristen Roupenian’s first story to be printed in the New Yorker was greeted with unparalleled enthusiasm on social media and off it as well. But why? There are no stylistic fireworks on display in
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8h Labour isn’t flip-flopping on Brexit – this is practical politics | Maya Goodfellow
The Guardian
While the prime minister has been muddying the EU waters, Jeremy Corbyn has been busy forming relationships in BrusselsFor some, Labour can do no right on Brexit. The party has a clear, adaptable position – but in recent days it has, somewhat predictably, been accused of being ambiguous. The party wants “
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9h What men can – and should – take from the viral New Yorker short story Cat Person
The Independent
'It's easier to just say yes' sex. 'I got myself into this and it's too late to back out now' sex. 'I don't enjoy this but don't want to hurt his feelings' sex. These are things women recognise and which we need to talk about
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9h The Tories’ rebranding won’t wash: being green is about more than fluffy bunnies | Molly Scott Cato
The Guardian
It’s all very well for Michael Gove to act as if the Tories love animals but they need to see the bigger picture on fracking, renewables and ecologyUp to their necks in Brexit chaos and with Corbyn’s Labour snapping at their heels, the Tories are trying again with a somewhat tired strategy to escape the label of the “nasty party”. They are having another go at acting like environmentalists, this time combining it with being nice to animals. At the helm of this
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10h Online abuse must be curbed. But who decides where the line is drawn? | Owen Jones
The Guardian
While rightwing papers call for better regulation of social media, history shows us that when such crackdowns happen it is often the left that suffers the mostFew would deny the importance of tackling online hatred or child abuse content. The internet, after all, has become a key weapon for those who disseminate and incite hatred and violence against minorities, and for those who pose a horrifying threat to children. It is difficult, though, not to feel discomfort about three rightwing newspapers – the Sun, the Daily Mail and the Times – all leading on the perils of social media.
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Why the robin needs to be pushed off its snowy Christmas card perch | Richard Smyth11h Why the robin needs to be pushed off its snowy Christmas card perch | Richard Smyth
The Guardian
Its red breast may look pretty and festive, but there are many less vicious, needy birds with better credentials for cute Crimbo poses. Here are some suggestionsWe all know by now that robins are outright beasts.
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Why sexual harassment should be treated as a hate crime13h Why sexual harassment should be treated as a hate crime
The Independent
Misogyny is hatred. Time to start fighting it that way
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I’ve watched Prince in Sign o’ the Times 156 times. Is that wrong? | Nell Frizzell13h I’ve watched Prince in Sign o’ the Times 156 times. Is that wrong? | Nell Frizzell
The Guardian
I know I’m not alone in savouring the ritualistic joy of rewatching films. They become part of your interior landscape, and can provide your best quotesAs a long-haired, Lycra-clad Prince proclaimed in 1990, there’s joy in repetition. Oh yes, there’s
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15h Haringey council taken over by Momentum? It’s just locals taking back control | Aditya Chakrabortty
The Guardian
This isn’t a hard left plot: Labour members simply opposed a council that handed its assets to private interests and turfed poor people out of their homes I’ve just been reading about the most terrifying place. For weeks, this “toxic” neighbourhood with its “poisonous” atmosphere has been all over the front pages and columns. It’s a land of revolutionary politics, of “ruthless attacks” and “purges”. Hordes of Trotskyists reportedly roam its high streets – like wildebeest, if they only swapped the majesty of the Serengeti for suburban pound shops. It sounds, frankly, dreadful. It also happens to be right next door to where I was born and raised. Indeed, it’s where I’ve spent much of the past year reporting, on exactly the local politics that now jostles news of Meghan and Harry’s engagement on the front page of the Times. Which is how I know that the fantasies generated by the Murdoch papers and others are just those: a purpose-built media onslaught.
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21h Theresa May: It’s Britain’s duty to help nations hit by climate change
The Guardian
The benefits of clean growth lay at the heart of our industrial strategy. But we must be at the forefront of the effort to keep global temperature rises at manageable levels Tackling climate change and mitigating its effects for the world’s poorest are among the most critical challenges the world faces. That is why I will join other world leaders gathering in Paris today for the
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25h With Jeremy Hunt working to save his skin, no NHS boss is safe | Polly Toynbee
The Guardian
Bob Kerslake was one of our best health officials – yet he’s been ousted on the health secretary’s whimDefenestration is a regular public spectacle in the NHS. Some chairs, chief executives and finance directors are pushed, while others jump before health department assassins arrive to blame them for debts caused by government underfunding.
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Just seven words are keeping a Brexit deal afloat for all sides | Gaby Hinsliff25h Just seven words are keeping a Brexit deal afloat for all sides | Gaby Hinsliff
The Guardian
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, goes the latest meaningless mantra. But sometimes maddening ambiguity is what makes politics workNothing is agreed until everything is agreed. If
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University vice-chancellors’ salaries in the spotlight | Letters26h University vice-chancellors’ salaries in the spotlight | Letters
The Guardian
Academic staff and students past and present respond to stories on the salaries of vice-chancellors at Bath and Birmingham universities. Plus
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26h Shortfalls in strategy to fight economic crime | Letters
The Guardian
Amber Rudd’s announcement of a new national economic crime centre for the UK fails to address glaring holes, say the representatives of four organisationsThe new national economic crime centre is to be welcomed but the home secretary’s announcement (
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The Guardian view on the Tory truce over Brexit: the war goes on | Editorial26h The Guardian view on the Tory truce over Brexit: the war goes on | Editorial
The Guardian
When Conservative MPs as different as Kenneth Clarke, Bill Cash, Nicky Morgan and Iain Duncan Smith agree, it can only mean their unity will not survive for longConservative MPs of every ideological hue queued up to praise Theresa May’s
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26h The Guardian view on NHS funding: hospitals are hurting | Editorial
The Guardian
Lord Kerslake is a big beast in the public sector. His resignation from the hospital trust he chaired ought not to be dismissed as a face-saving exercise. The Treasury is imposing a brutal decline on resources for healthcareBob Kerslake has been a big figure in public service for most of the past 20 years. He was a successful chief executive of Sheffield city council, before he was enticed to Whitehall where he became permanent secretary at the Department for Communities and Local Government, and for a time head of the civil service. In 2014 he left Whitehall to run King’s College hospital foundation trust in south London, and in 2015 he was made a member of the House of Lords. His public image is of a
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28h Politicians have to stop practicing creative ambiguity around Brexit sometime – and sooner rather than later
The Independent
The most divided government in decades, and the most childish ever, will soon have an opportunity to thrash out Britain's destiny around the Cabinet table. It's still hard to feel optimistic
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The tech giants will never pay their fair share of taxes – unless we make them | David Pegg28h The tech giants will never pay their fair share of taxes – unless we make them | David Pegg
The Guardian
Multinational companies should be taxed on where they genuinely do business – not on where they artificially shift their profits Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, and the accountants of Silicon Valley have proved
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Max Clifford, whose aggressive brand of PR so often replaced real journalism, had a deeply ironic downfall29h Max Clifford, whose aggressive brand of PR so often replaced real journalism, had a deeply ironic downfall
The Independent
For Clifford – and for the hacks who thrived on his murky way of doing things – people's lives were simply a means to a stunning headline or a bumper bottom line. His business was built on the commodification of individuals
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Labour will make Britain a great digital power: here’s how | Liam Byrne30h Labour will make Britain a great digital power: here’s how | Liam Byrne
The Guardian
The Teletext-era Tories have plunged us into a cyber depression. But Labour’s People’s Plan for Digital will launch a science revolution for an innovation nationSo the facts are in. The Tories have given us a recovery that is worse than the one in the 1930s that
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30h Writhing in linguine is fine, Emily Ratajkowski, if that’s your thing – but it’s not feminist
The Guardian
The model took part in a fashion video where she danced around while rubbing pasta on her oiled body, drawing criticism from some quarters. Our style expert, in her weekly column, says not everything needs to have an ideological underpinning
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Today's Snowmaggedon is the national holiday we were cruelly denied for Harry and Meghan's wedding30h Today's Snowmaggedon is the national holiday we were cruelly denied for Harry and Meghan's wedding
The Independent
It is a day for one to go mysteriously missing from one's job, muttering something about a shonky commuter track, knowing full well that no one in human resources will challenge you as they're 'working from home' too
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31h Senior Labour sources have told me how angry MPs are at Corbyn's Brexit stance. As a Lib Dem, I say it's time to take action
The Independent
I'll board any anti-Brexit battle bus – slogan on the side: 'Where's our £350m a week for the NHS you promised, Boris?' – with like-minded politicians from other parties to make the case. How many Labour MPs will join me?
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Kenneth Clarke versus Ed Balls on the Bank of England and the euro31h Kenneth Clarke versus Ed Balls on the Bank of England and the euro
The Independent
The former Chancellor and the chief adviser to his Labour successor clashed at King's College London last week
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31h What do British politicians want for Christmas – and what do they deserve? | Jack Bernhardt
The Guardian
After the year they’ve given us it’s only right that we should give May, Corbyn, Davis, Foster Cable and Farage a little something. So I’ve compiled a listChristmas is a hard time for politicians. They have to interact with children – tiny idiots who can’t even vote. They have to pretend to have wholesome Christmas traditions, such as going to a village fete in their constituency and sampling the local honey, when really they just want the Christmas we all have: getting drunk from 9am, shouting rude words at the Queen and crying solidly through Toy Story 3. And, worst of all, they’re impossible to buy gifts for.
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32h David Davis' Brexit performance has been somewhat lacking
The Independent
Please send your letters to letters@independent.co.uk
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Germans could learn a lot from their new immigrant neighbours 33h Germans could learn a lot from their new immigrant neighbours
The Independent
Firstly, they need to abandon the idea of their innate superiority, however fast their Audis and BWMs are
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33h We know polluting cars are killing us. So why do we put up with it? | Abi Wilkinson
The Guardian
The evidence of the damage air pollution does is undisputed. We should come to see car journeys as a last resortIf petrol and diesel vehicles were invented today, what possible justification would there be for allowing unchecked ownership? Knowing all we do about the damage wrought by burning fossil fuels – both to our immediate health and to the longterm viability of our habitat – it would seem an act of obscene, destructive decadence. The idea of driving a monstrous, tank-like 4x4 a distance you could easily walk or cycle, and then
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Aged 33, I was admitted to an NHS hospital with a suspected stroke. What I saw shocked me34h Aged 33, I was admitted to an NHS hospital with a suspected stroke. What I saw shocked me
The Independent
I had a lumbar puncture done where they forgot about sterilisation, I was sent for the wrong procedure by accident and my CT scan was read wrong. I don't believe this was due to incompetence – it happened because of stress
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34h Forget Italian pizza-twirling – what about Britain’s ‘intangible cultural heritage’? | Nigel Kendall
The Guardian
Not even morris dancing makes it on to Unesco’s list of intangible cultural treasures from around the world. So here are my top six contendersThe news that Unesco has recognised the
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35h Only a second referendum can pull us out of the Brexit fire | Geraint Davies
The Guardian
The facts of the EU divorce have changed so much, the final decision must go back to the people – as the bill I’m putting to parliament today urgesIt has been a tumultuous time. Last Friday a
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Brexit is just a distraction to the real problem: the UK’s clapped-out economy | Austin Mitchell36h Brexit is just a distraction to the real problem: the UK’s clapped-out economy | Austin Mitchell
The Guardian
We must rebalance the economy by widening the manufacturing and production base, making it competitive. Being in or out of the EU has little relevance
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In Erdoğan’s twisted Turkey, academics asking for peace are accused of terrorism | Judith Butler and Başak Ertür37h In Erdoğan’s twisted Turkey, academics asking for peace are accused of terrorism | Judith Butler and Başak Ertür
The Guardian
A petition asking Turkey to end violence against Kurds has been distorted by the president’s regime – and its signatories vilified. We must rally behind them Last week the trials began in Istanbul of those who signed the
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37h Johnny Marr and Maxine Peake: ‘You can’t avoid homelessness in Manchester. It touched us both’
The Guardian
When the musician and the actor met in 2014, they ‘clicked straight away’, bonding over a mission to bring back socially conscious art. They talk about shamanic rock stars, working-class guilt and how their spoken-word album about homelessness strives to be a modern Cathy Come Home Back in the autumn of 2014, Johnny Marr was about to release his second solo album, go on tour and get down to writing his autobiography. Maxine Peake, meanwhile, was playing Hamlet in a feverishly received production at the Royal Exchange theatre in Manchester. Marr had seen her in the film Keeping Rosy and enthused to an interviewer about the rarity of a “British suspense movie”. He added that she was “a good advertisement for British actors”. Peake sent him a thank-you letter – written on paper and put in the post. Some time later, they arranged to meet in a city-centre cafe. “I still remember being stood outside where we were meeting,” she says now, “being on the phone to my fella – and, literally, there were beads of sweat on my top lip. I said: ‘I’ll probably only be 15 minutes.’ And then five hours later, I emerged.”
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Mass starvation is humanity’s fate if we keep flogging the land to death | George Monbiot39h Mass starvation is humanity’s fate if we keep flogging the land to death | George Monbiot
The Guardian
The Earth cannot accommodate our need and greed for food. We must change our diet before it’s too lateBrexit; the crushing of democracy by billionaires; the next financial crash; a rogue US president: none of them keeps me awake at night. This is not because I don’t care – I care very much. It’s only because I have a bigger question on my mind. Where is all the food going to come from? By the middle of this century there will be two or three billion more people on Earth. Any one of the issues I am about to list could help precipitate mass starvation. And this is before you consider how they might interact.
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39h Outside the EU, Britain should be an evangelist for world trade | Liam Fox
The Guardian
Brexit gives us the chance to reshape Britain’s role on the global stage. We should champion the poverty-busting power of rules-based trade
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